Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Have Antarctic toothfish returned to McMurdo Sound?

  • Steven J. Parker (a1), Sophie Mormede (a2), Arthur L. Devries (a3), Stuart M. Hanchet (a1) and Regina Eisert (a4)...

Abstract

A dramatic reduction in catch rates of Antarctic toothfish in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, has led to conclusions that the commercial bottom longline fishery for toothfish in the Ross Sea has drastically altered the toothfish population with cascading effects on the McMurdo Sound ecosystem. However, results from a new monitoring programme for Antarctic toothfish and other top predators carried out in McMurdo Sound in 2014 have shown toothfish catch rate, fish size and fish age similar to those observed prior to 2002. These results suggest that either large and old fish have returned to McMurdo Sound following a temporary environmentally driven absence or that they remained locally present but were not detected in the areas sampled. These findings highlight the importance of continued standardized monitoring for detecting the potential effects of fishing on the Ross Sea ecosystem.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Have Antarctic toothfish returned to McMurdo Sound?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Have Antarctic toothfish returned to McMurdo Sound?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Have Antarctic toothfish returned to McMurdo Sound?
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the same Creative Commons licence is included and the original work is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

Corresponding author

References

Hide All
Ainley, D.G. & Ballard, G. 2012. Trophic interactions and population trends of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the southern Ross Sea. Aquatic Mammals, 38, 153160.
Ainley, D.G. & Siniff, D.B. 2009. The importance of Antarctic toothfish as prey of Weddell seals in the Ross Sea. Antarctic Science, 21, 317327.
Ainley, D.G., Nur, N., Eastman, J.T., Ballard, G., Parkinson, C.L., Evans, C.W. & DeVries, A.L. 2013. Decadal trends in abundance, size and condition of Antarctic toothfish in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, 1972–2011. Fish and Fisheries, 14, 343363.
CCAMLR 2013. A draft plan for research and monitoring in the Ross Sea region, in association with spatial marine protection. Delegations of New Zealand and the USA. Document SC-CAMLR-IM-I.BG.03 Rev. 1. Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR.
Davey, F.J. 2004. Ross Sea Bathymetry, 1:2 000 000, Version 1.0, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Geophysical Map 16. Lower Hutt, New Zealand: Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences.
DeVries, A.L., Ainley, D.G. & Ballard, G. 2008. Decline of the Antarctic toothfish and its predators in McMurdo Sound and the southern Ross Sea and recommendations for restoration. Document SC-CAMLR-WG-EMM-08/21. Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR.
Eastman, J.T. & DeVries, A.L. 1985. Adaptations for cryopelagic life in the Antarctic notothenioid fish Pagothenia borchgrevinki . Polar Biology, 4, 4552.
Eastman, J.T. & DeVries, A.L. 2000. Aspects of body size and gonadal histology in the Antarctic toothfish, Dissostichus mawsoni, from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Polar Biology, 23, 189195.
Eisert, R., Pinkerton, M.H., Newsome, S.D. & Oftedal, O.T. 2013. A critical re-examination of the evidence for a possible dependence of Weddell Seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) on Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni) in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Document SC-CAMLR-WG-EMM-13/28. Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR.
Eisert, R., Pinkerton, M.H., Torres, L., Currey, R.J.C., Ensor, P.H., Ovsyanikova, E.N., Visser, I.N. & Oftedal, O.T. 2014. Update on the Top Predator Alliance project, 2013–14 season: killer whales. Document SC-CAMLR-WG-EMM-14/52. Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR.
Hanchet, S.M., Mormede, S. & Dunn, A. 2010. Distribution and relative abundance of Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni) on the Ross Sea shelf. CCAMLR Science, 17, 3351.
Hanchet, S.M., Mormede, S., Parker, S.J., Dunn, A. & Jo, H.-S. 2012. Results of a CCAMLR-sponsored research survey to monitor abundance of pre-recruit Antarctic toothfish in the southern Ross Sea, February 2012. Document SC-CAMLR-WG-FSA-12/41. Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR.
Hanchet, S., Sainsbury, K., Butterworth, D., Darby, C., Bizikova, V., Godøa, O.R., Ichiia, T., Kocka, K.H., López Abellána, L. & Vacchi, M. 2015. CCAMLR’s precautionary approach to management focusing on Ross Sea toothfish fishery. Antarctic Science, 27, 10 1017/S095410201400087X.
Horn, P.L., Sutton, C.P. & DeVries, A.L. 2003. Evidence to support the annual formation of growth zones in otoliths of Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni). CCAMLR Science, 10, 125138.
Mormede, S., Dunn, A. & Hanchet, S.M. 2014a. A stock assessment model of Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni) in the Ross Sea region incorporating multi-year mark-recapture data. CCAMLR Science, 21, 3962.
Mormede, S., Parker, S.J., Hanchet, S.M., Dunn, A. & Gregory, S. 2014b. Results of the third CCAMLR sponsored research survey to monitor abundance of sub-adult Antarctic toothfish in the southern Ross Sea, February 2014 and development of the time series. Document SC-CAMLR-WG-FSA-14/51. Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR.
Pinkerton, M.H. & Bradford-Grieve, J.M. 2014. Characterising foodweb structure to identify potential ecosystem effects of fishing in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71, 10.1093/icesjms/fst230.
Raymond, J.A. 1975. Fishing for Antarctica’s largest fish, the Antarctic cod. Marine Technology Society Journal, 9, 3235.
Robinson, N.J. & Williams, M.J.M. 2012. Iceberg-induced changes to polynya operation and regional oceanography in the southern Ross Sea, Antarctica, from in situ observations. Antarctic Science, 24, 514526.
SC-CAMLR. 2012. Report of the Thirty-First Meeting of the Scientific Committee (SC-CAMLR-XXXI). Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR, 106 pp.
SC-CAMLR. 2013. Report of the Thirty-Second Meeting of the Scientific Committee (SC-CAMLR-XXXII). Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR, 122 pp.
Sutton, C.P., Parker, S.J. & Horn, P.L. 2012. Manual for age determination of Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni): V2. Document SC-CAMLR-WG-FSA-12/43. Hobart, TAS: CCAMLR.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed