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Sulphur and oxygen isotope signatures of dissolved sulphate in freshwater from King George Island, Antarctic Peninsula

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2021

Yeongmin Kim
Affiliation:
Research Center for Geochronology and Isotope Analysis, Korea Basic Science Institute, Cheongju28119, South Korea
Insung Lee
Affiliation:
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul08826, South Korea
Bernhard Mayer
Affiliation:
Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, AlbertaT2N 1N4, Canada
Guebuem Kim
Affiliation:
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul08826, South Korea
Jong Ik Lee
Affiliation:
Division of Polar Earth-system Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon21990, South Korea
Hyoungbum Kim*
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Science Education, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju28644, South Korea

Extract

The sulphate ion (SO42-) is one of major species in freshwater as well as seawater, originating from various natural and anthropogenic processes (Krouse & Mayer 2000). Compared to the Northern Hemisphere, where human activities affect the sulphate concentration and isotopic signatures, the contribution of anthropogenic sulphate is likely to be negligible in freshwater and ice cores in the Antarctic region (Patris et al. 2002). This means that the sulphur and oxygen isotope compositions of the dissolved sulphate could hint at information on the sources, formation and deposition due to various natural processes and sulphur cycling in the Antarctic region, especially for the dissolved sulphate in surface waters such as ponds and creeks (Patris et al. 2000, Kim et al. 2017). Here we report the ion concentration and sulphur and oxygen isotope compositions of the dissolved sulphate in freshwater from King George Island in the Antarctic Peninsula, which provide implications regarding the sources of the dissolved sulphate and the sulphur cycling in the Antarctic region.

Type
Earth Sciences
Copyright
Copyright © Antarctic Science Ltd 2021

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References

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