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Diversity of algae and lichens in biological soil crusts of Ardley and King George islands, Antarctica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 January 2017

Nadine Borchhardt*
Affiliation:
University of Rostock, Institute of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology & Phycology, Albert-Einstein-Straße 3, D-18059 Rostock, Germany
Ulf Schiefelbein
Affiliation:
Blücherstraße 71, D-18055 Rostock, Germany
Nelida Abarca
Affiliation:
Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem, Freie Universität Berlin, Königin-Luise-Straße 6-8, D-14195 Berlin, Germany
Jens Boy
Affiliation:
Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Soil Sciences, Herrenhäuser Straße 2, D-30419 Hannover, Germany
Tatiana Mikhailyuk
Affiliation:
University of Rostock, Institute of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology & Phycology, Albert-Einstein-Straße 3, D-18059 Rostock, Germany M.H. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Tereschenkivska St. 2, Kyiv UA-01001, Ukraine
Harrie J.M. Sipman
Affiliation:
Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem, Freie Universität Berlin, Königin-Luise-Straße 6-8, D-14195 Berlin, Germany
Ulf Karsten
Affiliation:
University of Rostock, Institute of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology & Phycology, Albert-Einstein-Straße 3, D-18059 Rostock, Germany

Abstract

In the present study the biodiversity of the most abundant phototrophic organisms forming biological soil crust communities were determined, which included green algae, diatoms, yellow-green algae and lichens in samples collected on Ardley and King George islands, Maritime Antarctic. The species were identified by their morphology using light microscopy, and for lichen identification thin layer chromatography as also used to separate specific secondary metabolites. Several sources of information were summarized in an algae catalogue. The results revealed a high species-richness in Antarctic soil crust communities with 127 species in total. Of which, 106 taxa belonged to algae (41 Chlorophyta, nine Streptophyta, 56 Heterokontophyta) and 21 to lichens in 13 genera. Moreover, soil crust communities with different species compositions were determined for the various sampling locations, which might reflect microclimatic and pedological gradients.

Type
Biological Sciences
Copyright
© Antarctic Science Ltd 2017 

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