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Proposition of a net-like model of snow

  • Zempachi Watanabe (a1)

Abstract

Thin-section photographs show that snow consists of lumpy parts and connecting branches. The model proposed here agrees with this real state. This new model is derived from four packing forms of isometric spheres by shrinking the original spheres while maintaining and connecting points of contact as a column. The texture of the model can be varied by setting the packing form, the shrinking ratio and the thickness of connecting branches. When the density and strength of the material of the model are set to the values of polycrystalline ice, the model density and tensile strength agree with published data for dry compacted snow.

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References

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Ballard, G.E.H. Feldt, E.D. 1966 A theoretical consideration of the strength of snow. J. Glaciol, 6(43), 159170.
Butkovich, T.R. 1956 Strength studies of high–density snows. SIPRE Res. Rep. 18.
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Manegold, E. Hofmann, R. Solf, K. 1931 Über Kapillarsysteme XII, I. Die mathematische Behandlung idealer Kugelpackungen und das Hohlraum Volumen realer Grusstrukturen. Kolloid Z., 56(2), 142159.
Watanabe, Z. 1964 A measurement of the coefficient of permeability and the height of capillary rise of snow layer. Fukushima University. Sci. Rep. 14, 1124. [In Japanese.]
Watanabe, Z. 1974 Measurement of specific surface of deposited snow. Fukushima University Sci. Rep. 24, 4354.
Watanabe, Z. 1975 Breaking strength of deposited snow. Fukushima University. Sci. Rep. 25, 3746.
Watanbe, Z. 1980 Developing a reticulate model of snow. Fukushima University Sci. Rep. 30, 1122.
Watanabe, Z. 1989 On the solid angle made from ice–bond in snow. Preprint of the conference of JSSI, Heisei 1. [In Japanese.]
Watanabe, Z. 1991 On the reticulate model and breaking strength of snow. Touhoku J. Natural Disaster Science, 27, 1520.

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