Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Freeboard, snow depth and sea-ice roughness in East Antarctica from in situ and multiple satellite data

  • Thorsten Markus (a1), Robert Massom (a2) (a3), Anthony Worby (a2) (a3), Victoria Lytle (a2), Nathan Kurtz (a4) and Ted Maksym (a5)...

Abstract

In October 2003 a campaign on board the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis had the objective to validate standard Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) sea-ice products. Additionally, the satellite laser altimeter on the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) was in operation. To capture the large-scale information on the sea-ice conditions necessary for satellite validation, the measurement strategy was to obtain large-scale sea-ice statistics using extensive sea-ice measurements in a Lagrangian approach. A drifting buoy array, spanning initially 50 km × 100 km, was surveyed during the campaign. In situ measurements consisted of 12 transects, 50–500 m, with detailed snow and ice measurements as well as random snow depth sampling of floes within the buoy array using helicopters. In order to increase the amount of coincident in situ and satellite data an approach has been developed to extrapolate measurements in time and in space. Assuming no change in snow depth and freeboard occurred during the period of the campaign on the floes surveyed, we use buoy ice-drift information as well as daily estimates of thin-ice fraction and rough-ice vs smooth-ice fractions from AMSR-E and QuikSCAT, respectively, to estimate kilometer-scale snow depth and freeboard for other days. the results show that ICESat freeboard estimates have a mean difference of 1.8 cm when compared with the in situ data and a correlation coefficient of 0.6. Furthermore, incorporating ICESat roughness information into the AMSR-E snow depth algorithm significantly improves snow depth retrievals. Snow depth retrievals using a combination of AMSR-E and ICESat data agree with in situ data with a mean difference of 2.3 cm and a correlation coefficient of 0.84 with a negligible bias.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Freeboard, snow depth and sea-ice roughness in East Antarctica from in situ and multiple satellite data
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Freeboard, snow depth and sea-ice roughness in East Antarctica from in situ and multiple satellite data
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Freeboard, snow depth and sea-ice roughness in East Antarctica from in situ and multiple satellite data
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Comiso, J.C., Cavalieri, D.J. and Markus, T.. 2003. Sea ice concentration, ice temperature, and snow depth using AMSR-E data. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 41(2), 243252.
Giles, K.A., Laxon, S.W. and Ridout, A.L.. 2008. Circumpolar thinning of Arctic sea ice following the 2007 record ice extent minimum. Geophys. Res. Lett., 35(22), L22502. (10.1029/2008GL035710.)
Kurtz, N.T., Markus, T., Cavalieri, D.J., Krabill, W., Sonntag, J.G. and Miller, J.. 2008. Comparison of ICESat data with airborne laser altimeter measurements over Arctic sea ice. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 46(7), 1913–1924.
Kwok, R. and Cunningham, G.F.. 2008. ICESat over Arctic sea ice: estimation of snow depth and ice thickness. J. Geophys. Res., 113(C8), C08010. (10.1029/2008JC004753.)
Kwok, R., Zwally, H.J. and Yi, D.. 2004. ICESat observations of Arctic sea ice: a first look. Geophys. Res. Lett., 31(16), L16401. (10.1029/2004GL020309.)
Kwok, R., Cunningham, G.F., Zwally, H.J. and Yi, D.. 2007. Ice, cloud, and land elevation satellite (ICESat) over Arctic sea ice: retrieval of freeboard. J. Geophys. Res., 112(C12), C12013. (10.1029/2006JC003978.)
Kwok, R., Cunningham, G.F., Wensnahan, M., I. Rigor, Zwally, H.J. and Yi, D.. 2009. Thinning and volume loss of the Arctic Ocean sea ice cover: 2003–2008. J. Geophys. Res., 114(C7), C07005. (10.1029/2009JC005312.)
Laxon, S., Peacock, N. and Smith, D.. 2003. High interannual variability in sea ice thickness in the Arctic region. Nature, 425(6961), 947950.
Long, D.G. 2000. A QuikSCAT/SeaWinds sigma-0 browse product, Version 2. Provo, UT, Brigham Young University.
Long, D.G. and Drinkwater, M.R.. 1999. Cryosphere applications of NSCAT data. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 37(3), 16711684.
Markus, T. and Cavalieri, D.J.. 1998. Snow depth distribution over sea ice in the Southern Ocean from satellite passive microwave data. In Jeffries, M.O., ed. Antarctic sea ice: physical processes, interactions and variability.Washington, DC, American Geophysical Union, 1939.
Markus, T. and 8 others. 2006. Microwave signatures of snow on sea ice: observations. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 44(11), 30813090.
Martin, S., Drucker, R., Kwok, R. and Holt, B.. 2004. Estimation of the thin ice thickness and heat flux for the Chukchi Sea Alaskan coast polynya from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data. J. Geophys.Res., 109(C10), C10012. (10.1029/2004JC002428.)
Maslanik, J. and 12 others. 2006. Spatial variability of Barrow-area shore-fast sea ice and its relationships to passive microwave emissivity. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 44(11), 30213031.
Massom, R. and 17 others. 2006. ARISE (Antarctic Remote Ice Sensing Experiment) in the East 2003: validation of satellite-derived sea-ice data products. Ann. Glaciol., 44, 288296.
Powell and 7 others. 2006. Microwave signatures of snow on sea ice: modeling. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 44, 30913102.
Stroeve, J.C. and 8 others. 2006. Impact of surface roughness on AMSR-E sea ice products. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 44(11), 31033117.
Tamura, T., Ohshima, K.I., Markus, T., Cavalieri, D.J., Nihashi, S. and Hirasawa, N.. 2007. Estimation of thin ice thickness and detection of fast ice from SSM/I data in the Antarctic Ocean. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 24(10), 17571772.
Worby, A.P. and Allison, I.. 1999. A technique for making ship-based observations of Antarctic sea ice thickness and characteristics. Part I. Observational techniques and results. Antarct. CRC Res. Rep. 14, 123.
Worby, A.P., Markus, T., Steel, A.D., Lytle, V.I. and Massom, R.A.. 2008. Evaluation of AMSR-E snow depth product over East Antarctic sea ice using in situ measurements and aerial photography. J. Geophys. Res., 113(C5), C05S94. (10.1029/2007JC004181.)
Zwally, H.J., Yi, D., Kwok, R. and Zhao, Y.. 2008. ICESat measurements of sea ice freeboard and estimates of sea ice thickness in the Weddell Sea. J. Geophys. Res., 113(C2), C02S15. (10.1029/2007JC004284.)

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Freeboard, snow depth and sea-ice roughness in East Antarctica from in situ and multiple satellite data

  • Thorsten Markus (a1), Robert Massom (a2) (a3), Anthony Worby (a2) (a3), Victoria Lytle (a2), Nathan Kurtz (a4) and Ted Maksym (a5)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.