Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Assessment of the relative accuracy of hemispheric-scale snow-cover maps

  • Dorothy K. Hall (a1), Richard E. J. Kelly (a2), George A. Riggs (a3), Alfred T. C. Chang (a1) and James L. Foster (a1)...

Abstract

There are several hemispheric-scale satellite-derived snow-cover maps available, but none has been fully validated. For the period 23 October–25 December 2000, we compare snow maps of North America derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and operational snow maps from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC), both of which rely on satellite data from the visible and near-infrared parts of the spectrum; we also compare MODIS maps with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive-microwave snow maps for the same period. The maps derived from visible and near-infrared data are more accurate for mapping snow cover than are the passive-microwave-derived maps, but discrepancies exist as to the location and extent of the snow cover even between operational snow maps. The MODIS snow-cover maps show more snow in each of the 8 day periods than do the NOHRSC maps, in part because MODIS maps the effects of fleeting snowstorms due to its frequent coverage. The large (~30 km) footprint of the SSM/I pixel, and the difficulty in distinguishing wet and shallow snow from wet or snow-free ground, reveal differences up to 5.33 x 106 km2 in the amount of snow mapped using MODIS vs SSM/I data. Algorithms that utilize both visible and passive-microwave data, which would take advantage of the all-weather mapping capability of the passive-microwave data, will be refined following the launch of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) in the fall of 2001.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Assessment of the relative accuracy of hemispheric-scale snow-cover maps
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Assessment of the relative accuracy of hemispheric-scale snow-cover maps
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Assessment of the relative accuracy of hemispheric-scale snow-cover maps
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Ackerman, S.A., Strabala, K.I., Menzel, P.W.P., Frey, R.A., Moeller, C.C. and Gumley, L.E.. 1998. Discriminating clear sky from clouds with MODIS. J. Geophys. Res., 103(D24), 32, 132–41,157.
Armstrong, R.L. and Brodzik, M.J.. 1999. A twenty year record of global snow cover fluctuations derived from passive microwave remote sensing data. In Fifth Conference on Polar Meteorology and Oceanography, 10–15January 1999, Dallas, Texas. Proceedings. Boston, MA, American Meteorological Society, 113–117.
Basist, A., Garrett, D., Ferraro, R., Grody, N. and Mitchell, K.. 1996. Comparison between snow cover products derived from visible and microwave satellite observations. J. Appl. Meteorol., 35(2), 163–177.
Brown, R.D. 1997. Historical variability in Northern Hemisphere spring snow-covered area. Ann. Glaciol., 25, 340–346.
Carroll, T.R. 1995. Remote sensing of snow in the cold regions. In Proceedings of the First Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Snow and Ice Workshop. Washington, DC, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 3–14. (NASA CP-3318.)
Chang, A.T.C. and Koike, T.. 2000. Progress in AMSR snow algorithm development. In Pampaloni, P. and Paloscia, S., eds. Microwave radiometric remote sensing of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere. Utrecht, VSP, 515–523.
Chang, A.T.C., Foster, J.L. and Hall, D.K.. 1987. Nimbus-7 SMMR derived global snow cover parameters. Ann. Glaciol., 9, 39–44.
Chang, A.T.C., Foster, J.L. and Hall, D.K.. 1992. Satellite remote sensing of snow. Trends Geophys. Res., 1, 31–41.
Derksen, C. and LeDrew, E.. 2000. Variability and change in terrestrial snow cover: data acquisition and links to the atmosphere. Prog. Phys. Geogr., 24(4), 469–498.
Grody, N.C. 1991. Classification of snow cover and precipitation using the special sensor microwave imager (SSMI). J.Geophys. Res., 96(D4), 7423–7435.
Grody, N. and Basist, A.. 1996. Global identification of snow cover using SSM/I measurements. IEEETrans. Geosci. Remote Sensing, GE-34(1), 237–249.
Hall, D.K., Foster, J.L., Salomonson, V.V., Klein, A.G. and Chien, J.Y.L.. 2001. Development of a technique to assess snow-cover mapping errors from space. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sensing, GE-39(2), 432–438.
Hall, D.K., Riggs, G.A., Salomonson, V.V., DiGirolamo, N. and Bayr, K.J.. In press. MODIS snow cover products. Remote Sensing Environ.
Hallikainen, M.T. and Jolma, P.A.. 1992. Comparison of algorithms for retrieval of snow water equivalent from Nimbus-7 SMMR data in Finland. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sensing, GE-30(1), 124–131.
Holroyd, E.W., Verdin, J.P. and Carroll, T.R.. 1989. Mapping snow cover with satellite imagery: comparison of results from three sensor systems. Western Snow Conference, 57th Annual Meeting, 18–20 April 1989, Fort Collins, Colorado, 59–68.
Klein, A.G., Hall, D.K. and Riggs, G.A.. 1998. Improving snow-covermapping in forests through the use of a canopy reflectancemodel. Hydrol. Processes, 12, 1723–1744.
Matson, M., Ropelewski, C.F. and Varnadore, M.S.. 1986. An atlas of satellite-derived Northern Hemispheric snow cover frequency. Washington, DC, U.S. Department of Commerce. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Data and Information Service. National Weather Service. National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service. (NOAA Atlas.)
Ramsay, B.H. 1998. The interactive multisensor snow and ice mapping system. Hydrol. Processes, 12, 1537–1546.
Robinson, D.A. 1993. Hemispheric snow cover from satellites. Ann. Glaciol., 17, 367–371.
Romanov, P., Gutman, G. and Csiszar, I.. 2000. Automated monitoring of snow cover over North America using multispectral satellite data. J. Appl. Meteorol., 39, 1866–1880.
Tait, A.B., Hall, D.K., Foster, J.L. and Armstrong, R.L.. 2000. Utilizing multiple datasets for snow-cover monitoring. Remote Sensing Environ., 72, 111–126.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed