Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

On-farm performance of Bunaji (White Fulani) cattle 1. Herd structures and cattle disposal

  • J. E. O. Rege (a1), R. R. von Kaufmann (a1) and R. I. Mani (a1)

Abstract

A study urns conducted to examine herd structures and cattle disposal patterns of Bunaji herds kept under traditional management at four locations in the subhumid zone of Nigeria. Sale for meat was the single most important disposal reason, accounting for proportionately 0·55 of all disposals. Mean age of cattle sold for meat was 8 years but the age range was wide: animals as old as 17·4 years were involved in such sales. Male animals were sold at a younger age (6·2 years) than females (9·3 years). Sale of calves was an important exit avenue for rural herds with less access to milk market. Calves were sold at a mean age of 1·1 years and male calves accounted for a larger proportion (0·62) of such sales. Animal sales were highest in the early dry season and lowest in the early wet season. The predominantly arable farming location, Ganawuri, had the highest frequency of animal sales and lowest frequency of exits for ‘social functions’ (exchanges, transfers and gifts). Animal transfers, gifts and exchanges were important disposal routes in the traditionally pastoral communities, especially in locations with good grazing (e.g. Abet). Exits involving exchanges, transfers and gifts were more frequent during the dry season and least frequent in the wet season. An average herd had 77 head of cattle composed proportionately of 0·54 adult females (>3 years), 0·13 adult males (>3 years), 0·08 young bulls (1 to 3 years), 0·13 heifers (1 to 3 years) and 0·11 calves (0 to 1 year). There was a tendency toward smaller herds in later years (97 in 1980 to 51 in 1989) and a decrease in the ratio of adult females to males (from 6:1 in 1980 to 3:1 in 1989). Substantial between-location differences existed in herd size ami herd structure, ranging from the ‘beef orientation’ of the arable Ganawuri with a high proportion of immatures and calves, to the pastoral situation in Abet and Kurmin Biri with high proportion of adult animals. The proportions of adults were lowest in the early dry season, reflecting seasonal pattern in disposal and calving. The pattern in disposal reasons over time indicated a decrease in the proportion of animals exiting herds through exchanges, transfers and gifts and signified a possible shift from tradition, probably a response to population pressures and emergence of cash economies.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Abaelu, J. N. 1973. The economics of livestock production in Nigeria. Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ife, Nigeria.
Bille, J. C. 1981. A Beotion approach to cattle herd structures in Kenya. International Livestock Centre for Africa, Kenya.
Bourne, D. 1983. Tsetse control, agricultural expansion and environmental change in Nigeria. D. Phil., University of Oxford.
Bishop, D. R. 1974. Livestock marketing in Szvaziland. Ministry of Agriculture, Swaziland.
Doran, M. H., Low, A. R. C. and Kemp, R. L. 1979. Cattle as a store of wealth in Swaziland: implications for livestock development and overgrazing in eastern and southern Africa. American Journal of Agricultural Economics 61: 4147.
International Livestock Centre for Africa. 1979. Livestock production in the subhumid zone of West Africa: a regional review. ILCA systems study no. 2, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Kaufmann, R. von. 1986. An introduction to the subhumid zone of West Africa and the ILCA subhumid zone programme. In Livestock systems research in Nigeria's subhumid zone. Proceedings of second ILCA/NAPRI symposium, Kaduna, Nigeria, 1984. International Livestock Centre for Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Lamorde, and Franti, C. E. 1975. Nomadism and cattle production in Nigeria. Proceedings of the first annual conference of Nigerian Society of Animal Production, Enitgu.
Nelson, G. and Spreen, T. 1978. Monthly steer and heifer supply. American journal of Agricultural Economics 60: 117125.
Otchere, E. O. 1986. Traditional cattle production in the subhumid zone of Nigeria. In Livestock systems research in Nigeria's subhumid zone. Proceedings of second ILCA/NAPRI symposium held in Kaduna, Nigeria, 1984. International Livestock Centre for Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Oyedipe, E. I., Buvanendran, V. and Eduvie, L. O. 1982. Some factors affecting the reproductive performance of White Fulani (Bunaji) cattle. Tropical Agriculture (Trinidad) 59: 231234.
Pullan, N. B. 1979. Productivity of White Fulani cattle on the Jos Plateu, Nigeria I. Herd structures and reproductive performance. Tropical Animal Health and Production 11: 231238.
Pullan, N. B. and Grindle, R. J. 1980. Productivity of White Fulani cattle on the Jos Plateus, Nigeria IV. Economic factors. Tropical Animal Health and Production 12: 161170.
Raay, J. G. T. van. 1974. Rural planning in a savannah region. University Press, Rotterdam.
Rege, J. E. O. 1992. LOGMLVAR: a computer programme for estimating sampling variances of predicted probabilities from maximum likelihood estimates in a logit response function. International Livestock Centre for Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Rege, J. E. O., Kaufmann, R. R. von, Mwenya, W. N. M., Otchere, E. O. and Mani, R. I. 1993. On-farm performance of Bunaji (White Fulani) cattle 2. Growth, reproductive performance, milk offtake and mortality. Animal Production 57:211220.
Statistical Analysis System Institute. 1987. SAS user's guide. SAS Institute, Inc., Cary NC.
Wheat, J. D., Leeuw, P. N. de and Koch, B. A. 1972. Bunaji cattle at the Shika Research Station, North Central State, Nigeria. Samaru Miscellaneous Paper No. 41. IAR, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
Wilde, J. C. de. 1967. Experiences with agricultural development in Tropical Africa, vol. 1 and 2. John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland.
Wilson, R. T., Leeuw, P. N. de and Haan, C. de, ed. 1983. Recherche sur les systemes des zones arides du Mali: resultats preliminaires. CIPEA rapport de reserche No. 5. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Winrock International. 1992. Assessment of animal agriculture in sub-Saharan agriculture. Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, Hamilton, Arkansas, USA.

Keywords

On-farm performance of Bunaji (White Fulani) cattle 1. Herd structures and cattle disposal

  • J. E. O. Rege (a1), R. R. von Kaufmann (a1) and R. I. Mani (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed