Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The effect of implantation with hormonal growth promoters on the response in the performance of beef cattle to protein supplementation of a silage-based diet

  • R. W. J. Steen (a1)

Abstract

An experiment has been carried out to examine the effects of implantation with hormonal growth promoters on the response in the performance of castrated male cattle (steers) to protein supplementation of a silage-based diet. The treatments consisted of grass silage offered ad libitum and supplemented with 2·7 kg per head daily of either a low protein (LP, 114 g crude protein per kg dry matter (DM)) or a high protein (HP, 206 g crude protein per kg DM) concentrate. Half of the animals, given each of the two concentrates were implanted with 20 mg oestradiol plus 200 mg progesterone and 300 mg trenbolone acetate at the beginning of the experiment and after 77 days, while the remainder of the animals received no implant, giving four treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Sixty-four British Friesian and Simmental cross steers which were initially 426 (s.e. 3·5) kg live weight were used. The treatments were imposed for 157 days. The silage used was well preserved and of high digestibility. For LP and HP concentrates given to non-implanted animals and LP and HP given to implanted animals respectively silage DM intakes were 5·7, 5·8, 6·3 and 6·6 (s.e. 0·18) kg/day; live-weight gains 0·96, 0·92, 1·22 and 1·33 (s.e. 0·045) kg/day; carcass gains 0·58, 0·53, 0·78 and 0·81 (s.e. 0·024) kg/day; carcass subcutaneous fat depth 6·0, 6·5, 5·8 and 5·5 (s.e. 0·35) mm; areas of m. longissimus dorsi 69·1, 58·5, 69·6 and 74·7 (s.e. 1·91) cm2 and marbling scores 3·0, 3·6, 3·3 and 3·1 (s.e. 0·25). It is concluded that protein supplementation of well preserved grass silage produced a marginal increase in the performance of implanted finishing steers but did not affect carcass fatness. With non-implanted steers protein supplementation produced a marginal depression in performance and increased carcass fatness.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Agricultural Research Council. 1965. Recommended Procedures for Use in the Measurement of Beef Cattle and Carcasses. Agricultural Research Council, London.
Drennan, M. J. 1973. Supplementation of silage with protein for beef cattle. Irish Grassland and Animal Production Association Journal 8: 3141.
Drennan, M. J. 1983. Supplementary concentrates for young fattening bulls fed silage. An Foras Taluntais, Animal Production Research Report, pp. 1314.
Drennan, M. J. and Keane, M. G. 1985. Concentrates for unimplanted and implanted fattening steers fed Silage. An Foras Talúntais, Animal Production Research Report, pp. 5960.
Egan, A. R. 1965. Nutritional status and intake regulation in sheep. II. The influence of sustained duodenal infusions of casein or urea upon voluntary intake of low-protein roughages by sheep. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 16: 451462.
England, P. and Gill, M. 1985. The effect of fish meal and sucrose supplementation on the voluntary intake of grass silage and live-weight gain of young cattle. Animal Production 40: 259265.
Gill, M. F., Beever, D. E., Buttery, P. J. and Baker, R. D. 1985. The effect of oestradiol implantation on the response to fishmeal in calves offered silage. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 44: 115A (Abstr.).
Kempster, A. J., Cuthbertson, A. and Harrington, G. 1982. Beef carcase grading and classification. In Carcass Evaluation in Livestock Breeding, Production and Marketing, pp. 163201, Granada, London.
Kirby, P. S., Chalmers, A. J. and Hannam, D. A. R. 1983. Fish meal supplementation of grass silage diets for fattening British Friesian steers. Animal Production 36: 538 (Abstr.).
Kirby, P. S., Outhwaite, J. R. and Jones, T. O. 1984. A comparison of two types of fish meal as protein supplements for finishing British Friesian steers given grass silage ad libitum. Animal Production 38: 551 (Abstr.).
Kirby, P. S., Outhwaite, J. R. and Jones, T. O. 1985. A comparison of formaldehyde-treated soya bean meal and fish meal as protein supplements for finishing beef cattle given grass silage. Animal Production 40: 552 (Abstr.).
Lowman, B. G., Neilson, D. R. and Hunter, E. A. 1985. The effect of growth promoters on fattening cattle:growth, intake and carcass composition. Animal Production 40: 538 (Abstr.).
McDonald, P. and Edwards, R. A. 1976. The influence of conservation methods on digestion and utilisation of forages by ruminants. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 35: 201211.
Martin, T. G., Perry, T. W., Beeson, W. M. and Mohler, M. T. 1978. Protein levels for bulls: comparison of three continuous dietary levels on growth and carcass traits. Journal of Animal Science 47: 2933.
Roche, J. F. 1980. The use of growth promoters in beef cattle. In The Uses, Residues and Toxicology of Growth Promoters. An Foras Taluntais, Animal Production Research Report, pp. 112.
Steen, R. W. J. 1985a. Protein supplementation of silage-based diets for calves. Animal Production 41: 293300.
Steen, R. W. J. 1985b. A comparison of bulls and steers impanted with various oestrogenic growth promoters in a 15-month semi-intensive system of beef production. Animal Production 41: 301308.
Steen, R. W. J. 1986. Effects of protein supplementation of silage-based diets on the intake, performance and carcass composition of finishing beef cattle. Animal Producation 42: 439 (Abstr.).
Steen, R. W. J. 1988. The effect of supplementing silage-based diets with soya-bean and fish meals for finishing beef cattle. Animal Production 46: 4351.
Thomas, P. C. and Chamberlain, D. G. 1982. The utilization of silage protein. In Forage Protein Conservation and Utilization, Commisson of the European Communities Seminar, Dublin, pp. 121145.
Waterhouse, A., Laird, R. and Holliday, R. J. 1983. A response to protein supplementation of grass silage for growing and finishing cattle. Animal Production 36: 503 (Abstr.).

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

The effect of implantation with hormonal growth promoters on the response in the performance of beef cattle to protein supplementation of a silage-based diet

  • R. W. J. Steen (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.