Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

A comparison for live weight and carcass production of Charolais, Hereford and Friesian steer progeny from Friesian cows finished on two energy levels and serially slaughtered

  • G. J. More O'Ferrall (a1) and M. G. Keane (a1)

Abstract

One hundred and sixty-two spring born steers comprising 54 Charolais × Friesian (CH), 54 Hereford × Friesian (HE) and 54 Friesians (FR) were reared together from shortly after birth until the end of their second grazing season at a mean age of 573 days. The animals were then blocked on weight within genotype, housed in a slatted shed and allocated to either a high (12·6 MJ metabolizable energy (ME) per kg) or a medium (10·4 MJ ME per kg) energy diet offered ad libitum until slaughter at one of three target carcass weights · light (260 kg (HE, FR and CH)), normal (300 kg (HE and FR) and 320 kg (CH)) or heavy (340 kg (HE and FR) and 380 kg (CH)) to give a 3 (breed type) · 2 (energy level) · 3 (slaughter weight) factorial arrangement during the finishing winter. The trial was repeated in 3 years consecutively.

CH were significantly heavier than HE at all times up to 18 months of age when they were 43 kg heavier, at which stage they were also 24 kg heavier than FR. CH grew significantly faster at pasture than HE in both seasons and faster than FR in the second season. HE had the best daily gain in the finishing period.

Overall slaughter weights per day of age, carcass weights per day of age and carcass weights of CH, HE and FR were 812, 771 and 761 (s.e. 9·2) g, 448, 418 and 405 (s.e. 4·8) g and 318. 299 and 298 (s.e. 2·2) kg, respectively. CH had significantly better killing-out proportions (lOg/kg) than HE which in turn were 10 g/kg better than FR. CH and FR had similar carcass length, carcass depth, leg length and leg widths and both were significantly larger than HE. CH had significantly larger longissimus dorsi areas than either HE or FR (80·9 v. 67·0 and 66·4 cm-); they also had significantly better conformation scores than HE which in turn were significantly better than FR.

Increasing the energy level during the finishing period increased daily gain by proportionately 0·52 (1089 v. 684 g/day), reduced slaughter age by 51 days (711 v. 762 days) and significantly increased killing-out proportion (551 v. 534 g/kg) and conformation score (4·86 v. 4·64). Offal as a proportion of empty live weight tended to be higher for FR than for HE or CH, the exception being the hide, which was significantly lower for FR.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Allen, D. and Kilkenny, B. 1980. Planned Beef Production. Granada, London.
Andersen, B. B., Liboriussen, T., Kousgaard, K. and Buchter, I. 1977. Crossbreeding experiments with beef and dual-purpose sire breeds on Danish dairy cows. Daily gain, feed conversion and carcass quality of intensively fed young bulls. Livestock Production Science 4: 1929.
Barber, K. A., Wilson, L. L., Ziegler, J. H., Levan, P. J. and Watkins, J. L. 1981. Charolais and Angus steers slaughtered at equal percentages of mature cow weight. 1. Effects of slaughter weight and diet density on carcass traits. Journal of Animal Science 52: 218231.
Callow, E. H. 1961. Comparative studies in meat. VII. A comparison between Hereford, Dairy Shorthorn and Friesian steers on four levels of nutrition. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 56: 265282.
De boer, H., Dumont, B. L., Pomeroy, R. W. and Weniger, J. H. 1974. Manual on E.A.A.P. reference methods for the assessment of carcass characteristics in cattle. Livestock Production Science 1: 151164.
Everitt, G. C, Jury, K. E., Dalton, D. C. and Langridge, M. 1980. Beef production of straight-bred and beef-cross Friesian steers in several environments. New Zealand Journal of Animal Science. 46: 255270.
Ferrell, C. L., Kohlmeier, R. H., Crouse, J. D. and Glimp, H. 1978. Influence of dietary energy, protein and biological type of steer upon rate of gain and carcass characteristics. Journal of Animal Science 23: 255270.
Flynn, A. V. 1981. Systems of beef production from dairy herd calves. In Calf To Beef, Handbook Series No. 17, pp. 13. An Foras Talúntaius, Dublin.
Geay, Y. and Robelin, J. 1979. Variation of meat production capacity in cattle due to genotype and level of feeding: genotype × nutrition interactions. Livestock Production Science 6: 263276.
Harte, F. J. and Connife, D. 1967. Studies on cattle of varying growth potential for beef production. 1. Growth rate, feed conversion and efficiency, carcass and offals. Irish Journal of Agricultural Research 6: 137152.
Harvey, W. R. 1985. Users' Guide for LSMLMW. (Mixed Model least squares and maximum likelihood computer program 10//85). Ohio State University.
Keane, M. G., More o'ferrall, G. J. and Connolly, J. 1989. Growth and carcass composition of Friesian, Limousin × Friesian and Blonde D'Aquitaine × Friesian steers. Animal Production 48: 353365.
Keane, M. G., More O'Ferrall, G. J., Connolly, J. and Allen, P. 1990. Carcass composition of serially slaughtered Friesian, Hereford × Friesian and Charolais × Friesian steers finished on two dietary energy levels. Animal Production. In press.
Kempster, A. J., Cook, G. L. and Southgate, J. R. 1982. A comparison of the progeny of British Friesian dams and different sire breeds in 16- and 24-month beef production systems. 2. Carcass characteristics, and rate and efficiency of meat gain. Animal Production 34: 167178.
Kempster, A. J., Cook, G. L. and Southgate, J. R. 1988. Evaluation of British Friesian, Canadian Holstein and beef breed × British Friesian steers slaughtered over a commercial range of fatness from 16- and 24-month beef production systems. 2. Carcass characteristics, and rate and efficiency of lean gain. Animal Production 46: 365378.
Liboriussen, T. 1982. Sire breed influence of various beef breeds on calving performance, growth rate, feed efficiency, carcass and meat quality. Proceedings of the European Community Seminar on Beef Production from Dairy Herds, Dublin (ed. O'Ferrall, G. J. More), pp. 8291. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague.
More o'ferrall, G. J. and Keane, M. G. 1987. Beef production from the dairy herd. In Breeding Dairy Cattle under Quota Restrictions, pp. 6675. An Foras Talúntais, Dublin.
Ryan, P. O. 1977. Beef carcass classification. Proceedings of Cattle Production Seminar, An Foras Taluntais, Grange, paper 21.
Smith, G. M., Laster, D. B., Cundiff, L. V. and Gregory, K. E. 1976. Characterization of biological types of cattle. II. Postwcaning growth and feed efficiency of steers. Journal of Animal Science 43: 3747.
Southgate, J. R., Cook, G. L. and Kempster, A. I. 1982. A comparison of the progeny of British Friesian dams and different sire breeds in 16- and 24- month beef production systems. 1. Live-weight gain and efficiency of food utilization. Animal Production 34: 155166.
Southgate, J. R., Cook, G. L. and Kempster, A. J. 1988. Evaluation of British Friesian, Canadian Holstein and beef breed × British Friesian steers slaughtered over a commercial range of fatness from 16-month and 24-month beef production systems. 1. Live-weight gain and efficiency of food utilization. Animal Production 46: 353364.
Teehan, T. J. 1982. Relative performance of beef breeds and their dairy crosses in Ireland. Proceedings of the European Community Seminar on Beef Production from Dairy Herds, Dublin (ed. O'Ferrall, G. J. More), pp. 6980. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

A comparison for live weight and carcass production of Charolais, Hereford and Friesian steer progeny from Friesian cows finished on two energy levels and serially slaughtered

  • G. J. More O'Ferrall (a1) and M. G. Keane (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.