Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-6f8dk Total loading time: 0.326 Render date: 2021-03-08T13:59:01.904Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 and cholesterol in relation to protein and fat deposition in growing pigs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

J. A. Taylor
Affiliation:
AFRC Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Shinfield, Reading RG2 9AQ
D. N. Salter
Affiliation:
AFRC Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Shinfield, Reading RG2 9AQ
W. H. Close
Affiliation:
AFRC Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Shinfield, Reading RG2 9AQ
G. H. Laswai
Affiliation:
AFRC Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Shinfield, Reading RG2 9AQ
Get access

Abstract

The nutrient partitioning of growing pigs was altered through nutrition and castration in order to investigate the relationship between serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGFl) and protein deposition and serum cholesterol and fat deposition. In a 2 × 2 factorial experiment 18 entire and 18 castrated male pigs, of 20 kg initial live weight, were given either 2·25 (low) or 3·4 (high) times maintenance energy requirements to a scale based on live weight. Nitrogen and energy balances were measured over 7-day periods when the pigs reached about 30, 60 and 90 kg. Fasting blood samples were taken at each weight and serum was analysed for IGFl and insulin and total- and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Protein and fat deposition, IGFl and cholesterol concentrations were higher for pigs given the high, as opposed to the low, feeding level. Protein deposition and IGFl concentrations were higher for entire males, as opposed to castrated males, whereas fat deposition and cholesterol concentrations were higher in castrated than in entire males. IGFl and protein deposition increased with age for entire but not for castrated males. Conversely, fat deposition increased with age in castrated but not in entire males. There was no effect of age on serum cholesterol. Serum IGFl was correlated with protein deposition at 30, 60 and 90 kg (r = 0·40, r = 0·63 and r = 0·67; P < 0·05, P < 0·002 and P < 0001 respectively, no. = 36). Serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol were correlated with fat deposition at 60 and 90 kg (r = 0·65 and r = 0·54; both P < 0·001 for total cholesterol; r = 0·66 and r = 0·50; both P < 0·001 for LDL-cholesterol). Insulin levels were similar for pigs in all treatment groups. It is concluded that serum IGFl and cholesterol may give a useful indication of protein and fat deposition in pigs of between 60 and 90 kg live weight.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1992

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Agricultural Research Council. 1981. The nutrient requirements of pigs. Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, Slough.Google Scholar
Aulstad, D. 1970. In vivo estimation of carcass composition i n young boars. III. The use of urinary creatinine, total plasma protein and total plasma cholesterol. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica 20: 6569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beynen, A. C., Schouten, J. A., Terpstra, A. H. M. and Visser, J. 1983. Density profile and cholesterol concentration of serum lipoproteins in pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. Zeitschrift Versuchstierkunde 25: 333337.Google Scholar
Buonomo, F. C., Lauterio, T. J., Baile, C. A. and Campion, D. R. 1987. Determination of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and IGF binding protein levels in swine. Domestic Animal Endocrinology 4: 2331.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Campbell, R. G., Tavemer, M. R. and Curie, D. M. 1985. The influence of feeding level on the protein requirement of pigs between 20 and 45 kg live weight. Animal Production 40: 489496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlson, L. A. and Ericson, M. 1975. Quantitative and qualitative serum lipoprotein analysis. Studies in healthy men and women. Atherosclerosis 21: 417433.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Copeland, K. C., DeSouza, M. M. and Gibson, P. C. 1990. Influence of gonadal steroids on rat pituitary growth hormone secretion. Research in Experimental Medicine 137143.Google Scholar
Copeland, K. C., Eichberg, J. W., Parker, C. R. and Bartke, A. 1985. Puberty in the chimpanzee: somatomedin-C and its relationship to somatic growth and steroid hormone concentrations. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 60: 11541160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Copeland, K. C., Kuehl, T. J. and Castracane, V. D. 1982. Pubertal endocrinology of the baboon: elevated somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor 1 at puberty. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 55: 11981201.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
DeLong, D. M., DeLong, E. R., Wood, P. D., Lippel, K. and Rifkind, B. M. 1986. A comparison of methods for the estimation of plasma low- and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Study. Journal of The American Medical Association. 256: 23722377CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fletcher, J. M., Quinlan, P. T. and Heath, A. D. 1990. Nutritional control of circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormone concentrations in growing pigs. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 49: 156A.Google Scholar
Golden, M., Waterlow, J. C. and Picou, D. 1977. The relationship between dietary intake, weight change, nitrogen balance and protein turnover in man. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 30: 13451348.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harris, D. A., Van Vliet, G., Egli, C. A., Grumbach, M. M., Kaplan, S. L., Styne, D. M. and Vainsel, M. 1985. Somatomedin-C in normal puberty and in true precocious puberty before and after treatment with a potent luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 61: 152159.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heidenreich, C. J., Garwood, V. A. and Harrington, R. B. 1964. Swine growth and composition as associated with total serum cholesterol. Journal of Animal Science 23: 496498.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heller, R. F., Wheeler, M. J., Micallef, J., Miller, N. E. and Lewis, B. 1983. Relationship of high density lipoprotein cholesterol with total and free testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin. Acta Endocrinologica 104: 253256.Google ScholarPubMed
Hizuka, N., Takano, K., Asakawa, K., Sukegawa, I., Fukuda, I., Demura, H., Iwashita, M., Adachi, T. and Shuzume, K. 1991. Measurement of free form of insulin-like growth factor-1 in human plasma. Growth Regulation 1: 5155Google ScholarPubMed
Houseknecht, K. L., Boggs, D. L., Campion, D. R., Sartin, J. L., Kiser, T. E., Rampacek, G. B. and Amos, H. E. 1988. Effect of dietary energy source and level on serum growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1, growth and body composition in beef heifers. Journal of Animal Science 66: 29162923.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Isley, W. L., Underwood, L. E. and Clemmons, D. R. 1983. Dietary components that regulate serum somatomedin-C concentrations in humans. Journal of Clinical Investigation 175182.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Katan, M. B., Van Gastel, A. C., De Rover, C. M., Van Montfort, M. A. J. and Knuiman, J. T. 1988. Differences in individual responsiveness of serum cholesterol to fat-modified diets in man. European Journal of Clinical Investigation 18: 644647.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCusker, R. H., Campion, D. R., Jones, W. K. and Clemmons, D. R. 1989. The insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins of porcine serum: endocrine and nutritional regulation. Endocrinology 125: 501509.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maes, M., Underwood, L. E. and Ketelslegers, J.-M. 1983. Plasma somatomedin-C in fasted and refed rats: close relationship with changes in liver somatogenic but not lactogenic binding sites. Journal of Endocrinology 97: 243252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nestel, P. J., Whyte, H. M. and Goodman, DeW. S. 1969. Distribution and turnover of cholesterol in humans. Journal of Clinical Investigation 48: 982991.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Owens, P. C., Conlon, M. A., Campbell, R. G., Johnson, R. J., King, R. and Ballard, F. J. 1991. Developmental changes in growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) and IGF-binding proteins in plasma of young growing pigs. Journal of Endocrinology 128: 439447.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pell, J. M., Gill, M., Beever, D. E., Jones, A. R. and Cammell, S. B. 1989. Hormone and nutrient interaction in the control of growth: role of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor—1. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 48: 83A.Google Scholar
Philips, L. S. 1986. Nutrition, somatomedins and the brain. Metabolism 35: 7887.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salmon, W. D. and DuVall, M. R. 1970. In vitro stimulation of leucine incorporation into muscle and cartilage protein by a serum fraction with sulphation factor activity: differentiation of effects from those of growth hormone and insulin. Endocrinology 87: 11681180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Semmens, J., Rouse, I., Beilin, L. J. and Masarei, J. R. L. 1983. Relationship of plasma HDL-cholesterol to testosterone, estradiol and sex-hormone binding globulin levels in men and women. Metabolism 32: 428432.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Taylor, J. A., Salter, D. N., Close, W. H. and Laswai, G. H. 1991a. Effects of feeding level and sex on fat deposition and serum cholesterol in growing pigs. Animal Production 52: 602 (abstr.).Google Scholar
Taylor, J. A., Salter, D. N., Close, W. H., Laswai, G. H. and Hudson, A. 1991b. Effects of feeding level and sex on nitrogen retention and insulin-like growth factor-1 in growing pigs. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 50: 62A.Google Scholar
Taylor, J. A., Salter, D. N. and Lister, D. 1990. Serum cholesterol as an indicator of performance and carcass quality in growing pigs. Animal Production 50: 572 (abstr.).Google Scholar
Tremere, A. W., Owen, B. D. and Bell, J. M. 1966. Relationship between blood serum lipid and protein constituents and carcass measurements in swine. Journal of Animal Science 25: 138141.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zapf, J., Hauri, C., Waldvogel, M. and Froesch, E. R. 1986. Acute metabolic effects and half-lives of intravenously administered insulin-like growth factor I and II in normal and hypophysectomised rats. Journal of Clinical Investigation 77: 17681775.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 6 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 8th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 and cholesterol in relation to protein and fat deposition in growing pigs
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 and cholesterol in relation to protein and fat deposition in growing pigs
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 and cholesterol in relation to protein and fat deposition in growing pigs
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *