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A note on the fatty acid composition of backfat from boars in comparison with gilts and barrows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

R. R. Smithard
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU
W. C. Smith
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU
M. Ellis
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU
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Abstract

Backfat from each of 25 littermate boars, barrows and gilts, which were crosses of the Large White and British Landrace breeds slaughtered at approximately 90 kg live weight, was analysed for fatty acid composition. Fat from boars had a significantly higher proportion of total unsaturated fatty acids (61·6%) compared with barrows (60·2%), This sex difference was due to a lower palmitic acid (16:0) content and higher linoleic (18:2) and linolenic (18:3) fatty acid levels in backfat of boars. Gilts were intermediate to boars and barrows in the degree of unsaturation of backfat.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1980

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References

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