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Endocrine changes and their relationship with body weight in growing yaks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 August 2016

Tian Yongqiang
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou, Gansu, 730070
Zhao Xingxu
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou, Gansu, 730070
Wang Minqiang
Affiliation:
Lanzhou Institute of Animal Science, CAAS, Lanzhoou, Gansu 730050, China
Lu Zhonglin
Affiliation:
Lanzhou Institute of Animal Science, CAAS, Lanzhoou, Gansu 730050, China
Zhang Rongchang
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou, Gansu, 730070
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Abstract

The concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin (Ins), tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) in blood samples of growing yaks during different bimonthly seasons were determined by radioimmunoassay. The changes of body weight of growing yaks and composition of grass grazed were measured accordingly. The seasonal changes of hormones were significant (P < 0·01 or P < 0·05). Within season, the variances of hormones depended upon the different growing stages. The body-weight gains in the different groups varied in different seasons, increase being significant in May, July and September, decrease being significant from January to May. Correlation analysis indicated that T4 concentration had a significant positive correlation with the body weight of the growing yaks(r = 0·2509, P < 0·05) and other hormones did not have any significant correlation with body weight. The results showed that the annual cycle of weight loss and gain was attributed to the seasonal change of nutrition status. The seasonal change of the assayed hormones depended on the grass growth.

Type
Growth, development and meat science
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 2002

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