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The effect of body weight and energy intake on the composition of deposited tissue in pigs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 May 2016

K. H. de Greef
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition, Agricultural University, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands
M. W. A. Verstegen
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition, Agricultural University, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands
B. Kemp
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition, Agricultural University, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands
P. L. van der Togt
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition, Agricultural University, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Abstract

Many pig growth models assume that there is no effect of energy intake and of body weight on the ratio of lipid to protein deposition rate in pigs below their maximal protein deposition rate. An experiment was performed to check whether an effect of body weight and of amount of energy intake on this partitioning of energy is indeed absent when protein deposition is limited by energy intake. Two constant amounts of energy were given above maintenance requirement (12·6 and 16·3 MJ digestible energy (DE) per day for production, treatment L and H, respectively). A total of 52 entire male pigs were slaughtered at 25,45, 65, 85 or 105 kg live weight. Results showed that, for both levels of intake, the ratio of lipid to protein deposition rate increased with increasing body weight. At the L energy intake, the ratio of lipid to protein deposition rate increased from 0·74 at 25 kg to 0·99 at 105 kg body weight. In animals receiving the H treatment, the ratio of lipid to protein deposition rate increased from 0·82 to 1·35 in that weight range. This change in nutrient partition was also reflected in daily gain. Daily gain declined with increasing live weight, a decrease of 150 g/day over the weight range 25 to 105 kg. The 3·7 MJ DE difference in energy intake between treatment H and L resulted in an average overall difference of 105 g daily gain. A control group fed ad libitum showed that protein deposition capacity was above 200 g/day, thus the pigs at the L and H treatment were below their protein deposition capacity. It was concluded that both live weight and energy intake influence the ratio of lipid to protein deposition rate. The mechanism of partitioning between lipid and protein deposition below maximal protein deposition capacity needs further specification in order to improve the predictions of growth models which use the linear-plateau concept.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1994

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