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Fire, demography and the persistence of siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus: Hylobatidae) in a Sumatran rainforest

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 April 2003

Timothy G. O'Brien
Affiliation:
Wildlife Conservation Society - Indonesia Program, PO Box 311, Jl. Pangrango 8, Bogor 16003, Indonesia
Margaret F. Kinnaird
Affiliation:
Wildlife Conservation Society - Indonesia Program, PO Box 311, Jl. Pangrango 8, Bogor 16003, Indonesia
Anton Nurcahyo
Affiliation:
Wildlife Conservation Society - Indonesia Program, PO Box 311, Jl. Pangrango 8, Bogor 16003, Indonesia
Maya Prasetyaningrum
Affiliation:
Wildlife Conservation Society - Indonesia Program, PO Box 311, Jl. Pangrango 8, Bogor 16003, Indonesia
Muhammad Iqbal
Affiliation:
Wildlife Conservation Society - Indonesia Program, PO Box 311, Jl. Pangrango 8, Bogor 16003, Indonesia
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Abstract

We show a direct impact of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related fires on the demography and persistence of the siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus), a frugivorous, Southeast Asian rainforest primate. Siamang groups affected by ENSO-related wildfires in a Sumatran rainforest were significantly smaller and experienced significantly lower infant and juvenile survival. Likelihood of infants surviving to subadults was higher by a factor of 2.8 for groups in undisturbed habitat. Burn groups had access to 48% fewer reproductive-size strangling fig trees in their territories, compared to non-burn groups. Dietary and foraging behaviour changes associated with habitat disturbance may result in lower productivity and higher mortality of young animals. Reproductive potential of burn groups is insufficient to offset low survival and groups are unlikely to persist for more than two generations. Increasing frequency of ENSO events increases the likelihood that siamang and other long-lived species that rely on fruiting trees will experience multiple fires within one generation; the resulting reduction in seed dispersal services will slow recovery of burned forest.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2003 The Zoological Society of London

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