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A Technological Typology of Prismatic Blades and Debitage From Ojo de Agua, Chiapas, Mexico1

  • John E. Clark (a1) and Douglas Donne Bryant (a1)

Abstract

A technological typology for the description and analysis of Mesoamerican obsidian industries is proposed, and its relative merits vis-à-vis Sheets's (1975a) “behavioral” typology are briefly explored. The typology is used to classify and describe a pristine deposit of obsidian-blade refuse recovered from the Early Classic Maya site of Ojo de Agua, Chiapas, Mexico. Analysis of this deposit revealed that the obsidian artifacts were manufacturing refuse resulting from the production of fine prismatic blades from polyhedral cores imported from highland Guatemala. The obsidian refuse was recovered from a workshop dump rather than from an actual workshop.

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A Technological Typology of Prismatic Blades and Debitage From Ojo de Agua, Chiapas, Mexico1

  • John E. Clark (a1) and Douglas Donne Bryant (a1)

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