Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Genetic and Molecular Studies on Om, a Locus Controlling Mouse Preimplantation Development

  • M. Cohen-Tannoudj (a1), P. Balducci (a1), C. Kress (a1), V. Richoux-Duranthon (a2), J.P. Renard (a2) and C. Babinet (a2)...

Extract

Several lines of evidence have accumulated in recent years indicating that nuclear cytoplasmic interactions play an important role in the formation and fate of the developing mouse embryo. Early nuclear transplantation experiments indicated that the ability of nuclei to direct cleavage after transfer into enucleated zygotes falls abruptly with nuclei from more advanced preimplantation stages [1]. Transcriptional activation of the nuclei, which occurs during the second cell cycle probably precludes the reprogramming of nuclei from later cleavage stages [2]. Thus, when an 8-cell nucleus is transferred to an enucleated zygote, such a reconstituted zygote is blocked at the 2-cell stage. However, when identical 8-cell nuclei were transferred into both blastomeres of enucleated 2-cell embryos, they were able to support development to the blastocyst stage and even gave rise to live offspring [2-4]. This indicated the importance of the cytoplasmic environment for the ability of the incoming nucleus to support development. It should be noted that in these experiments, the nuclear cytoplasmic ratio was also an important factor in determining the development of the reconstituted embryos [2]. Similar observations were also made when monitoring the development of haploid embryos [5]. In another study, Latham and Solter [6] examined the ability of androgenones, obtained by replacing the female pronucleus of a zygote by the male pronucleus, to develop to the blastocyst stage. Androgenones generated from C57B1/6 eggs were found to be much more competent to give rise to blastocysts than were DBA/2 androgenones. However, when androgenones were constructed from (DBA/2×C57B1/6)F1, zygotes (genetic constitution of the embryos will hereafter be indicated with the female parent coming first followed by the male parent), by replacing the DBA/2 female pronucleus with a C57B1/6 pronucleus, they also developed poorly. This was not simply due to the lack of some component in DBA/2 cytoplasm, since the impaired development was also observed when C57B1/6 male pronuclei from pairs of (DBA/2×C57B1/6) F1, were transferred to an enucleated C57B1/6 egg.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Genetic and Molecular Studies on Om, a Locus Controlling Mouse Preimplantation Development
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Genetic and Molecular Studies on Om, a Locus Controlling Mouse Preimplantation Development
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Genetic and Molecular Studies on Om, a Locus Controlling Mouse Preimplantation Development
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Institut Pasteur, Unité de Biologie du Développement - 25, rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France

References

Hide All
1. McGrath, J, Solter, D: Inability of mouse blastomere nuclei transferred to enucleated zygotes to support development in vitro. Science 1984; 226: 13171319.
2. Howlett, SK, Barton, SC, Surani, MA: Nuclear cytoplasmic interactions following nuclear transplantation in mouse embryos. Development 1987; 101: 915923.
3. Tsunoda, Y, Yasui, T, Shioda, Y, Nakamura, K, Uchida, T, Sugie, T: Full term development of mouse blastomere nuclei transplanted to enucleated two-cell embryos. J Exp Zool 1987; 242: 147151.
4. Barnes, FL, Robl, JM, First, NL: Transplantation in mouse embryos: Assessment of nuclear function. Biol Reprod 1987; 36: 12671274.
5. McGrath, J, Solter, D: Nucleocytoplasmic interactions in the mouse embryo. J Embryol Exp Morphol 1986; 97 (suppl): 277289.
6. Latham, KE, Solter, D: Effect of egg composition on the developmental capacity of androgenetic mouse embryos. Development 1991; 113: 561568.
7. Reik, W, Römer, I, Barton, SC, Surani, MA, Howlett, SK, Klose, J: Adult phenotype in the mouse can be affected by epigenetic events in the early embryo. Development 1993; 119: 933942.
8. Wakasugi, N, Tomita, T, Kondo, K: Differences of fertility in reciprocal crosses between inbred strains of mice DDK, KK and NC. J Reprod Fertil 1967; 13: 4150.
9. Wakasugi, N: Studies on fertility of DDK and C57B1/6J strains and experimental transplantation of the ovary. J Reprod Fertil 1972; 33: 283291.
10. Buehr, M, Lee, S, McLaren, A, Warner, A: Reduced gap junctional communications is associated with the lethal condition characteristic of DDK mouse eggs fertilized by foreign sperm. Development 1987; 101: 449459.
11. Leclerc, C, Becker, D, Buehr, M, Warner, A: Low intracellular pH is involved in the early embryonic death of DDK mouse eggs fertilized by alien sperm. Dev Dyn 1994; 200: 257267.
12. Wakasugi, N: A genetically determined incompatibility system between spermatozoa and eggs leading to embryonical death in mice. J Reprod Fertil 1974; 41: 8594.
13. McGrath, J, Solter, D: Nuclear transplantation in the mouse embryo by microsurgery and cell fusion. Science 1983; 220: 13001302.
14. Renard, JP, Babinet, C: Identification of a paternal developmental effect on the cytoplasm of one-cell-stage mouse embryos. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1986; 83: 68836886.
15. Mann, JR: DDK egg-foreign sperm incompatibility in mice is not between the pronuclei. J Reprod Fertil 1986; 76: 779781.
16. Wassarman, PM, Kinloch, RA: Gene expression during oogenesis in mice. Mutat Res 1992; 296: 315.
17. Babinet, C, Richoux, V, Guenet, JL, Renard, JP: The DDK inbred strain as a model for the study of interactions between parental genomes and egg cytoplasm in mouse preimplantation development. Development 1990; (suppl): 8187.
18. Renard, JP, Baldacci, P, Richoux-Duranthon, V, Pournin, S, Babinet, C: A maternal factor affecting mouse blastocyst formation. Development 1994; 120: 797802.
19. Baldacci, PA, Richoux, V, Renard, JP, Guénet, JL, Babinet, C: The locus Om, responsible for the DDK syndrome, maps close to Sigje on mouse chromosome 11. Mamm Genome 1992; 2: 100105.
20. Sapienza, C, Paquette, J, Pannunzio, P, Albrechtson, S, Morgan, K: The polar-lethal ovum mutant gene maps to the distal portion of mouse chromosome 11. Genetics 1992; 132: 241246.
21. Wilson, GN: Mutational risks in females: Genomic imprinting and maternal molecules. Mutat Res 1992; 296: 157165.
22. Schultz, GA, Heyner, S: Gene expression in pre-implantation mammalian embryos. Mutat Res 1992; 296: 1731.
23. Chess, A, Simon, I, Cedar, H, Axel, R: Allelic inactivation regulates olfactory receptor gene expression. Cell 1994;78: 823834.

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Genetic and Molecular Studies on Om, a Locus Controlling Mouse Preimplantation Development

  • M. Cohen-Tannoudj (a1), P. Balducci (a1), C. Kress (a1), V. Richoux-Duranthon (a2), J.P. Renard (a2) and C. Babinet (a2)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.