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The United States and the Statute of Rome

  • Monroe Leigh
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1 United Nations Diplomatic Conference of Plenipotentiaries on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court, Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court July 17,1998, UN Doc. A/CONF.183/9*, corrected Nov. 10, 1998, and July 12, 1999, obtainable from <http://www.un.org/law/icc/index.html>, reprinted in 37 ILM 999 (1998) (uncorrected version) [hereinafter Statute of Rome or Rome Statute].

2 Although President Clinton on December 31, 2000, authorized signature of the Rome treaty, he did so with a statement reiterating “concerns about significant flaws in the treaty” and announcing “I will not, and do not recommend that my successor submit the treaty to the Senate for advice and consent until our fundamental concerns are satisfied.” 37 Weekly Comp. Pres. Doc. 4 (Jan. 8, 2001).

3 Statute of Rome, supra note 1, Art. 17.

4 See the Web site supra note 1 for a current report on the status of ratifications and other information on the ICC.

5 Statute of Rome, supra note 1, Art. 120.

6 Agreement Between the Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Relating to the Status of Their Forces, June 19, 1951, Art. VII, 4 UST 1792, 199 UNTS 67.

7 The Schooner Exchange v. M’ Faddon, 11 U.S. (7 Cranch) 116, 136 (1812).

8 Wilson v. Girard, 354 U.S. 524, 529 (1957) (per curiam).

9 Statute of Rome, supra note l, Art. 18(1).

10 Id., Arts. 17-19.

11 Id., Art. 18(2).

12 Id., Art. 20.

13 Id., Art. 18.

14 Id., Art. 17(1).

15 Id., Art. 16.

16 Id., Art. 63.

17 Id., Arts. 20, 22, 57, 61, 63, 66, 67, 69.

The United States and the Statute of Rome

  • Monroe Leigh

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