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Pheromones: Their potential role in control of agricultural insect pests

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2009


Philipp Kirsch
Affiliation:
Field Development Manager (North America), Biocontrol Limited, 719 Second Street, Suite 12, Davis, CA 95616.

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Serious side effects from the conventional use of traditional chemical pesticides for routine arthropod pest management have prompted the investigation and development of alternate strategies for the minimization of pest damage. Insect sex pheromones have been proposed as a potential group of alternative control agents for over twenty years. The possible uses of these substances for insect control are discussed and factors influencing their development for pest management are presented. The scientific research and commercial development of oriental fruit moth mating disruption is presented as a case study for the commercialization of this approach. Advantages and limitations of pheromone-based control tactics are presented. Mating disruption technology is starting to find its place in a number of diverse cropping situations. The use of pheromones for pest control promises to be an important component of the ongoing challenge to develop alternatives that may help to solve major environmental and human health problems associated with chemical pesticide use in agriculture.


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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

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