Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-28jzs Total loading time: 0.296 Render date: 2021-03-05T20:58:53.961Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

A letter to a friend: Artificial intelligence and intelligent artifacts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 January 2012

Ellen Yi-Luen Do
Affiliation:
College of Architecture and College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article
Type
Reflections
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

Dear AI EDAM,

I am very happy that we will be celebrating your 25th birthday this year. Perhaps a coming of age celebration is in order? David and Yan said that we should all say something for this occasion, so I am writing you a personal note.

Alan Kay was quoted as saying that the best way to predict the future is to invent it. Meanwhile, ideas, innovations, and inventions all need a forum to strive. You have, in your quiet manner, provided a nice venue for researchers, both novice and seasoned, to present and exchange ideas. Kudos to you!

You have a broad range of interests and have hosted a wide variety of interesting research endeavors in your portfolio. As I reflect on all our joint adventures in the past decade, I am happy to say that it has been a fun and exciting journey and a personal and meaningful one. The “Drawing Marks, Acts and Reacts” article [16(3), 2002] in the Special Issue on Human–Computer Interaction in Engineering Contexts presented my work in sketch computing to support design by providing appropriate knowledge-based tools at the right time. Claudia Eckert and I put together the Special Issue on Understanding, Representing, and Reasoning about Style [20(3), 2006] with articles on methods, analysis, and applications for design in products, vehicles, and architecture. Mark Gross and I created the Back to the Real World: Tangible Interaction for Design [23(2), 2009] Special Issue to introduce your readers to the growing field of coupling digital information to physical representations that are mediated by human senses, leveraging the affordances of things and control mechanisms. Last year, Ashok Goel and I filled our Special Issue on Design Computing and Cognition [24(1), 2010] with articles addressing three sources for design research: design computing, design cognition, and human-centered information technology. People are increasingly developing artificial intelligence as well as intelligent artifacts.

If we consider artificial intelligence as the science and engineering of making intelligent machines with intelligent programs, the challenges ahead of us would be both on the understanding of human intelligence and on providing methods and insights to help implement the computational abilities into physical reality to achieve goals in the world. This is no easy task. In the upcoming 10 years I would expect you to take things in stride by continuing to provide forums for researchers to share ideas and discoveries about artificial intelligence in engineering design, analysis, and manufacturing and perhaps addressing the universe of all scales as depicted in the movie Powers of Ten toward realizations of Star Trek gadgetries, mythical and magical Hogwarts, and nurturing next generation modern day Leonardo da Vincis?

May the Force be with you!

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 75
Total number of PDF views: 265 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 5th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A letter to a friend: Artificial intelligence and intelligent artifacts
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A letter to a friend: Artificial intelligence and intelligent artifacts
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A letter to a friend: Artificial intelligence and intelligent artifacts
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *