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Economic Effects of a Countervailing Duty Order on the U.S. Lamb Meat Industry

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2016

Ronald A. Rabula
Affiliation:
Agricultural Crops Branch, Agriculture and Forest Products Division, U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), Washington, D.C.
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Abstract

This paper provides the model, analysis, and results of the investigative research by the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) staff on the U.S. lamb market impacts from the countervailing duty (CVD) order imposed on certain U.S. imports of New Zealand lamb meat during 1985–90. Presented here are the monthly three-stage least squares model of the U.S. lamb meat industry at the wholesale or meat-packing level, along with the econometric results and analyses obtained from the USITC investigation. Analysis of model results quantifies average estimated CVD-attributed effects on U.S. lamb price, demand and supply of domestically produced lamb, and U.S. lamb import levels. A number of economic parameter estimates and inference results concerning U.S. wholesale lamb market relationships are reported and are of interest, given the scarce published research on the U.S. lamb industry.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association 

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