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Health and welfare profile of Australian baby boomers who live in rented accommodation – implications for the future

  • ANNE W. TAYLOR (a1), RHIANNON PILKINGTON (a2), ELEONORA DAL GRANDE (a1), CONSTANCE KOURBELIS (a3) and HELEN BARRY (a4)...

Abstract

Baby boomers who rent are often overlooked as an important sub-group. We aimed to assess the chronic conditions, risk factors, socio-economic factors and other health-related factors associated with renting in private or public housing. Data from telephone interviews conducted each month in South Australia between 2010 and 2015 were combined. Prevalence estimates were assessed for each risk factor and chronic condition by housing status. The association between housing status and variables of interest were analysed using logistic regression models adjusting for multiple covariates (age, gender, income, smoking, physical activity, area and year of data collection). Overall, 17.4 per cent of the 16,687 baby boomers interviewed were renting, either privately or using government-subsided housing. The health profile of renters (both private and public) was poorer overall, with renters more likely to have all of the chronic conditions and ten risk factors assessed. For public renters the relationships were maintained even after controlling for socio-economic and risk factor variables for all chronic diseases except osteoporosis. This research has provided empirical evidence of the considerable differences in health, socio-economic indicators and risk factors between baby boomers who rent and those who own, or are buying, their own homes.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence : Anne W. Taylor, Population Research & Outcome Studies, Discipline of Medicine, L7, SAHMRI, North Terrace, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia E-mail: Anne.taylor@adelaide.edu.au

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