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The effects of familism on intended care arrangements in the process of preparing for future care among one-child parents in urban China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2016

YAJUN SONG*
Affiliation:
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
ELSIE C. W. YAN
Affiliation:
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
SILVIA SÖRENSEN
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA.
*
Address for correspondence: Yajun Song, Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Island 999077, Hong Kong E-mail: osyajun@hku.hk

Abstract

Guided by Sörensen and Pinquart's model of preparation for future care, this study investigated the relationship between familism and intended care arrangements. Ordinal logistic regression was performed on a sample of 516 urban Chinese one-child parents aged 45–65 with an equal gender ratio to examine the associations between five care expectations, familism (filial obligation and child gender) and future care planning constructs (awareness, information gathering and avoidance). Awareness and information gathering were positively associated with service-focused care arrangements. Avoidant planners were more inclined to rely on adult children. Participants with a stronger filial obligation had greater expectations for ageing at home with the aid of a spouse, siblings or helper. Child gender was not significantly associated with intended care arrangements. The model of preparation for future care was useful when predicting service-focused care arrangements. Familism was a powerful predictor of family-focused care arrangements. Females were more likely to rely on children regardless of child gender but less likely to rely on spouses and siblings. The study enriches researchers' understanding of urban Chinese older adults' intended care arrangements in the context of fading familism and single-child families.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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