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Becoming Indigenous in Africa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2013

Abstract:

This article traces the history of how and why certain African groups became involved in the transnational indigenous rights movement; how the concept of the indigenous has been imagined, understood, and employed by African activists, donors, advocates, and states; and the opportunities and obstacles it has posed for the ongoing struggles for recognition, resources, and the rights of historically marginalized people like Maasai.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © African Studies Association 2009

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