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Spectral/hp element technology for global flow instability and control

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2017

V. Theofilis
Affiliation:
DLR, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Göttingen, Germany
D. Barkley
Affiliation:
Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, UK
S. Sherwin
Affiliation:
Dept of Aeronautics, Imperial College, UK

Abstract

The objective of our paper is to demonstrate the use of spectral/hp element technology in unravelling global flow instability mechanisms. Understanding these mechanisms is central to devising flow control approaches based on theoretically-founded physical principles. Global instability theory is concerned with prediction and control of linear and nonlinear disturbances developing in flows that are inhomogeneous in more than one spatial direction. As such, this theory encompasses the classic analysis of Tollmien which is valid for simple geometries of academic interest (e.g. a flat-plate) and therefore broadens the scope of this well-established but simplified methodology to include realistic problems encountered in aeronautical engineering. Compared with a direct numerical simulation approach, global instability theory can be used to explore efficiently far wider parameters ranges and deliver physical information to be used as handle for effective flow control.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 2002

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