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Potential of reducing the environmental impact of aviation by using hydrogen Part II: Aero gas turbine design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 February 2016

Abstract

The main objective of the paper is to evaluate the potential of reducing the environmental impact of civil subsonic aviation by using hydrogen fuel. The paper is divided into three parts of which this is Part II. In Part I the background, prospects and challenges of introducing an alternative fuel in aviation were outlined. In this paper, Part II, the aero engine design when using hydrogen is covered. The subjects of optimum cruising altitude and airport implications of introducing liquid hydrogen-fuelled aircraft are raised in Part III.

The study shows that burning hydrogen in an aero gas turbine seems to be feasible from a technical point of view. If the priority is to lower the mission fuel consumption, the results indicate that an engine employing increased combustor outlet temperature, overall pressure ratio and by-pass ratio, seems to be the most attractive choice. The mission NOx emissions, on the other hand, seem to be reduced by using engines with a weak core and lowered by-pass ratio.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 2015

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