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On the maximisation of control power in low-speed flight

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2019

L. M. B. C. Campos
Affiliation:
IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico Universidade de Lisboa Lisboa, PortugalCentre for Aeronautical and Space Science and Technology (CCTAE)Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
J. M. G. Marques
Affiliation:
IDMEC, Atlântica - Escola Universitária de Ciências Empresariais Saúde, Tecnologias e Engenharia, Fábrica da Pólvora de Barcarena Barcarena, Oeiras, 2730-036, PortugalCentre for Aeronautical and Space Science and Technology (CCTAE)Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal

Abstract

The maximisation of control power is considered for an aircraft with multiple control surfaces, with the force and moment coefficients specified by polynomials of the control surface deflections of degree two. The optimal deflections, which maximise and minimise any force or moment coefficient, are determined subject to constraints on the range of deflection of each control surface. The results are applied to a flying wing configuration to determine: (i/ii) the pitch trim, at the lowest drag for the fastest climb, and at the highest drag for the steepest descent; (iii) the maximum and minimum pitching moment; (iv) the maximum and minimum yaw control power and the fraction needed to compensate an outboard engine failure for several propulsion configurations; (v) the maximum and minimum rolling moment. The optimal use of all control surfaces has significant advantages over using just one, e.g. the range of drag modulation with pitch trim is much wider and the maximum and minimum available control moments larger.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Royal Aeronautical Society 2019 

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