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Buffeting tests in a cryogenic windtunnel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 July 2016

D. G. Mabey
Affiliation:
Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College, London
R. P. Boyden
Affiliation:
Nasa Langley, USA
W. G. Johnson
Affiliation:
Nasa Langley, USA

Summary

Measurements of wing buffeting, using root strain gauges, were made in the Nasa Langley 0-3 m cryogenic windtunnel to refine techniques which will be used in larger cryogenic facilities such as the United States National Transonic Facility (NTF) and the European Transonic Windtunnel (ETW). The questions addressed included the relative importance variations in frequency parameter and Reynolds number, the choice of model material (considering both stiffness and damping) and the effects of static aeroelastic distortion.

The main series of tests was made on three half models of slender 65° delta wings with a sharp leading edge. The three delta wings had the same planform but widely differing bending stiffnesses and frequencies (obtained by varying both the material and the thickness of the wings). It was known that the steady flow on this configuration would be insensitive to variations in Reynolds number. On this wing at vortex breakdown the spectrum of the unsteady excitation is unusual, having a sharp peak at particular frequency parameter.

Additional tests were made on one unswept half-wing of aspect ratio 1·5 with an NPL 9510 aerofoil section, known to be sensitive to variations in Reynolds number at transonic speeds. The test Mach numbers were M = 0·21 and 0·35 for the delta wings and to M = 0·30 for the unswept wing. On this wing the unsteady excitation spectrum is fairly flat (as on most wings). Hence correct representation of the frequency parameter is not particularly important.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 1995

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References

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