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X-Ray Diffraction of Radioactive Materials*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2019

D. Schiferl
Affiliation:
Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545
R. B. Roof
Affiliation:
Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545
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Abstract

X-ray diffraction studies on radioactive materials are reviewed. Considerable emphasis is placed on the safe handling and loading of not-too-exotic samples. Special considerations such as the problems of film blackening by the gamma rays and changes induced by the self-irradiation of the sample are covered. Some modifications of common diffraction techniques are presented. Finally, diffraction studies on radioactive samples under extreme conditions are discussed, with primary emphasis on high-pressure studies involving diamond-anvil cells.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Centre for Diffraction Data 1978

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Footnotes

*

Work performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy.

References

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