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Using psychotherapy effectively: choosing an appropriate treatment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Extract

Making effective use of psychotherapy can be difficult for patients and their doctors, for a number of reasons. First, the term ‘psychotherapy’ itself is unsatisfactory, used by some people to indicate a particular type of psychotherapy (usually psychodynamic), and by others to embrace all forms of psychological treatment. When we use the term ‘medication’ we usually add a qualifying adjective (e.g. antidepressant or antipsychotic medication) and it is helpful to do so in psychotherapy (e.g. dynamic therapy, cognitive therapy, etc.).


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 1999 

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