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Targeting the HPA axis in major depression: does it work?: Invited commentary on … Antiglucocorticoids in Psychiatry

  • Stephan Claes

Summary

In the search for antidepressant drugs with enhanced efficacy, targeting the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is a valid strategy. This commentary critically summarises the evidence for the efficacy of antidepressant drugs targeting the HPA axis, and concludes that the available clinical trials do not support claims that this class of drugs is superior to existing treatments.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Professor Stephan Claes, Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Email: Stephan.Claes@uzleuven.be

Footnotes

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See pp. 242–249, this issue.

Declaration of Interest

S. C. is or has been member of the Belgian Advisory Board of Eli Lilly, Wyeth, BMS, Servier, and Lundbeck. He has received a research grant from Johnson & Johnson.

Footnotes

References

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Targeting the HPA axis in major depression: does it work?: Invited commentary on … Antiglucocorticoids in Psychiatry

  • Stephan Claes

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Targeting the HPA axis in major depression: does it work?: Invited commentary on … Antiglucocorticoids in Psychiatry

  • Stephan Claes
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