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Managing cannabis use in people with severe mental illness: what can be done?

  • Zerrin Atakan

Summary

Nearly half of people with severe mental illness use cannabis sometime in their lives and during their illness. Its use can have multiple and severe consequences for the course of the illness. Despite the significance of the problem, managing cannabis use in this group is a recently developing topic and is still in its infancy. This article reviews the current state of knowledge on the management of people with severe mental illness who continue to use cannabis, specifically focusing on different models of service provision, and psychological and pharmacological interventions.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Zerrin Atakan, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: Zerrin.Atakan@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Footnotes

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This is the second of two articles by Zerrin Atakan in Advances on cannabis use in people with severe mental illness. The first, which addressed the extent of the problem, its assessment and the reasons why cannabis is used, appeared in the previous issue of the journal (2008; 14: 423–31).

Declaration of Interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Managing cannabis use in people with severe mental illness: what can be done?

  • Zerrin Atakan

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