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A study of the neuropsychological correlates in adults with high functioning autism spectrum disorders

  • Ronna Fried (a1) (a2), Gagan Joshi (a1) (a2), Pradeep Bhide (a3), Amanda Pope (a1), Maribel Galdo (a1), Ariana Koster (a1), James Chan (a1), Stephen V. Faraone (a4) (a5) and Joseph Biederman (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

To examine the unique neuropsychological presentation in adults with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HF-ASD) by comparison with adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Methods

Adults with ASD referred to a specialty clinic (n=26) were compared to two non-ASD groups with (n=52) and without (n=52) ADHD of similar age and sex.

Results

No differences in IQ were found. Subjects with HF-ASD were significantly more impaired than both comparison groups in processing speed, cognitive flexibility and sight words. Subjects with HF-ASD were more impaired than controls in working memory, but not the ADHD group.

Conclusion

These findings suggest that there may be specific neuropsychological correlates of HF-ASD differing from ADHD that could have significant implications for identifying individuals at risk for ASD.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Ronna Fried, Clinical and Research Program in Pediatric Psychopharmacology and Adult ADHD, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street WRN 705, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Tel: +617-724-0963; Fax: +617-724-3742; E-mail: rfried@partners.org

References

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A study of the neuropsychological correlates in adults with high functioning autism spectrum disorders

  • Ronna Fried (a1) (a2), Gagan Joshi (a1) (a2), Pradeep Bhide (a3), Amanda Pope (a1), Maribel Galdo (a1), Ariana Koster (a1), James Chan (a1), Stephen V. Faraone (a4) (a5) and Joseph Biederman (a1) (a2)...

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