Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Childhood trauma and psychosis: a critical review
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Childhood trauma and psychosis: a critical review
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Childhood trauma and psychosis: a critical review
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Background:

A significant proportion of people with psychotic disorders report traumatic experiences in childhood, such as sexual and physical abuse. Similarly, a proportion of childhood trauma (CT) survivors report psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions. Are these psychotic symptoms in trauma survivors part of the sequelae of CT or do they co-occur by chance? Much of the research into the relationship between CT and psychosis has suffered from a lack of methodological rigor and thus has failed to answer this question. Past reviews have paid little attention to these methodological problems (Read 1997, 2005; Morrison 2003). The aim of this review was to synthesize and critically evaluate the evidence.

Method:

Medline and Psychinfo databases were systematically searched and papers identified were assessed according to eligibility criteria. The reference sections of identified papers were also searched.

Results:

Forty-nine papers were identified. The rates of CT reported in groups with psychosis ranged between 19% and 83%. Child sexual abuse prevalence rates ranged between 17% and 79%. Reports of child physical abuse ranged from 10% to 61%. When compared with nonclinical controls, those with psychosis reported more trauma. Epidemiological studies investigating the relationship of CT to psychotic diagnosis and symptoms have found mixed results. However, all studies have methodological problems.

Conclusions:

These studies tentatively suggest a relationship between CT and psychosis. Further good quality research is needed to clarify any association.