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Theory of mind in adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia: correlations with clinical assessment and executive functions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2016

Soumaya Bourgou
Affiliation:
Child Psychiatry Department, Mongi Slim Hospital, Marsa, Tunisia Research Unit UR 02/04, Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia
Soumeyya Halayem
Affiliation:
Research Unit UR 02/04, Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia Child Psychiatry Department, Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia
Isabelle Amado
Affiliation:
University Psychiatry Department, Saint Anne Hospital, Paris, France Psychiatric Physiopathology Laboratory, UMR894, INSERM, Paris, France Paris Descartes Faculty of Medicine, Paris, France
Racha Triki
Affiliation:
Research Unit UR 02/04, Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia Psychiatry Department (B), Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia
Marie Chantal Bourdel
Affiliation:
University Psychiatry Department, Saint Anne Hospital, Paris, France Psychiatric Physiopathology Laboratory, UMR894, INSERM, Paris, France Paris Descartes Faculty of Medicine, Paris, France
Nicolas Franck
Affiliation:
Le Vinatier Hospital Center, Lyon, France Claude Bernard University, Lyon 1, France
Marie Odile Krebs
Affiliation:
University Psychiatry Department, Saint Anne Hospital, Paris, France Psychiatric Physiopathology Laboratory, UMR894, INSERM, Paris, France Paris Descartes Faculty of Medicine, Paris, France
Karim Tabbane
Affiliation:
Research Unit UR 02/04, Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia Psychiatry Department (B), Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia
Asma Bouden
Affiliation:
Research Unit UR 02/04, Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia Child Psychiatry Department, Razi Hospital, Mannouba, Tunisia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective

We examined Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities in adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and their correlation with clinical findings and Executive Functions (EF).

Methods

The ToM abilities of 12 adolescents with EOS were compared with those of healthy participants matched in age and educational level. The Moving Shapes Paradigm was used to explore ToM abilities in three modalities: random movement, goal-directed movement and ToM – scored on the dimensions of intentionality, appropriateness and length of each answer. EF was tested using Davidson’s Battery and the clinical psychopathology with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS).

Results

Adolescents with EOS were significantly more impaired than controls in the three dimensions evaluated for the goal-directed and ToM modalities. Regarding the random movement modality, the only difference was in appropriateness (p<0.01). No correlation with age or level of education was evident for ToM skills. Total PANSS score was negatively correlated with appropriateness score for the goal-directed (p=0.02) and ToM modalities (p=0.01). No correlation existed between performance in the ToM Animated Tasks and positive, negative or disorganisation PANSS subscores. No correlations were found among the three scores in the Moving Shapes Paradigm and any measures of the accuracy of the three tasks assessing EF.

Conclusion

Our results confirm previous findings of ToM deficits in adult individuals with schizophrenia and attest the severity of these deficits in patients with EOS.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Scandinavian College of Neuropsychopharmacology 2016 

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