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New insights in cognitive behavioural therapy as treatment of panic disorder: a brief overview

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2014

J. R. L. M. Luermans
Affiliation:
Maastricht University and Academic Anxiety Center, PO Box 88, 6200 AB Maastricht, the Netherlands
K. De Cort
Affiliation:
Maastricht University and Academic Anxiety Center, PO Box 88, 6200 AB Maastricht, the Netherlands
K. Schruers
Affiliation:
Maastricht University and Academic Anxiety Center, PO Box 88, 6200 AB Maastricht, the Netherlands
E. Griez
Affiliation:
Maastricht University and Academic Anxiety Center, PO Box 88, 6200 AB Maastricht, the Netherlands
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been proved to be very effective in the treatment of panic disorder. In this article we attempt to give a brief representation of more recent insights and techniques in the field of cognitive behavioural therapy in the treatment of panic disorder.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Blackwell Munksgaard

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References

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