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The neuropathological study of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in the temporal lobe of schizophrenia patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 March 2018

Tomoyasu Marui*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
Youta Torii
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
Shuji Iritani
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
Hirotaka Sekiguchi
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
Chikako Habuchi
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
Hiroshige Fujishiro
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
Kenichi Oshima
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Kazuhiro Niizato
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Shotaro Hayashida
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Japan
Katsuhisa Masaki
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Japan
Junichi Kira
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Japan
Norio Ozaki
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
*
Author for correspondence: Tomoyasu Marui, Department of Psychiatry, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai 65, Shouwa, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550, Japan. Tel: +81 52 744 2282; Fax: +81 52 744 2293; E-mail: Maruchan0529@gmail.com

Abstract

Objective

Recent studies based on the neuroimaging analysis, genomic analysis and transcriptome analysis of the postmortem brain suggest that the pathogenesis of schizophrenia is related to myelin-oligodendrocyte abnormalities. However, no serious neuropathological investigation of this protein in the schizophrenic brain has yet been performed. In this study, to confirm the change in neuropathological findings due to the pathogenesis of this disease, we observed the expression of myelin-oligodendrocyte directly in the brain tissue of schizophrenia patients.

Methods

Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was evaluated in the cortex of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the hippocampus in 10 schizophrenic and nine age- and sex-matched normal control postmortem brains.

Results

The expression of MOG was significantly lower in the middle layer of the neocortex of the STG and stratum lucidum of CA3 in the hippocampus in the long-term schizophrenic brains (patients with ≥30 years of illness duration) than in the age-matched controls. Furthermore, the thickness of MOG-positive fibre-like structures was significantly lower in both regions of the long-term schizophrenic brains than in the age-matched controls.

Conclusion

These findings suggest that a long duration of illness has a marked effect on the expression of MOG in these regions, and that myelin-oligodendrocyte abnormalities in these regions may be related to the progressive pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Scandinavian College of Neuropsychopharmacology 2018 

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