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Feeling the heat: the electrode–skin interface during DCS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2014

Jim Lagopoulos*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, CADE Clinic, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia Academic Discipline of Psychological Medicine, Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Advanced Research and Clinical High-field Imaging, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Racheal Degabriele
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, CADE Clinic, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia Academic Discipline of Psychological Medicine, Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
*
Dr Jim Lagopoulos, CADE Clinic, Level 5, Building 36 Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards NSW 2065, Australia. Tel: +61 2 9926 7746; Fax: +61 2 9926 7730; E-mail: jlagopoulos@med.usyd.edu.au

Abstract

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Type
Brain Bytes
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard

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References

Fregni, F, Freedman, S, Pascual-Leone, A. Recent advances in the treatment of chronic pain with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques. Lancet Neurol 2007;6:188191. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yamaguchi, K, Hori, Y. Long lasting retention of cortical dominant focus in rabbit. Med J Osaka Univ 1975;26:3950. Google ScholarPubMed
Nitsche, MA, Liebetanz, D, Antal, A, Lang, N, Tergau, F, Paulus, W. Modulation of cortical excitability by weak direct current stimulation – technical, safety and functional aspects. Suppl Clin Neurophysiol 2003:56:255276. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Patriciu, A, Yoshida, K, Struijk, JJ, Demonte, TP, Joy, ML, Stodkilde-Jorgensen, H. Current density imaging and electrically induced skin burns under surface electrodes. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 2005;52:20242031. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Swartz, CM. Safety and ect stimulus electrodes: I. Heat liberation at the electrode-skin interface. Convuls Ther 1989;5:171175. Google ScholarPubMed
Lambert, H. Skin resistance behaviour during galvanic therapy. Eur J Phys Med Rehabil 1994; 4:190195. Google Scholar
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