Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        11-02 Identifying affective markers within an integrative neuroscience model of depression
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        11-02 Identifying affective markers within an integrative neuroscience model of depression
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        11-02 Identifying affective markers within an integrative neuroscience model of depression
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Background:

Our integrative model of depression focuses on disturbances in affective and cognitive function, which contribute to clinical depression. Endophenotypes for depression include disturbances in emotion processing and in inhibitory executive functions. If these disturbances are trait like in nature, consistent with endophenotype status, we might expect them to be present in subclinical depression. Following a dimensional view of depression, our objective was to identify emotion perception and cognitive markers of subclinical depression while controlling for the effects of age and gender.

Method:

Subjects from the Brain Resource International Database (BRID) were tested on the standardized BRID protocols, which included assessment for level of depressed mood and performance on the computerized tests of social (facial emotion recognition) and general cognition.

Results:

Regression analyses showed that higher subclinical depression was significantly predicted by both social cognition (lower accuracy for recognizing fearful expressions, as well as slower reaction time for recognizing expressions of happiness and anger) and general cognition (reduced inhibition on the go-no-go test). These findings were observed over and above the effects of age and gender. When considered together, the combination of poor fear recognition and poor inhibition made the greatest contribution to level of depression.

Conclusions:

Our results provide support for an integrated model of depression, in which difficulties in both emotion processing and inhibition are defining features. Dysregulation of frontolimbic circuits may contribute to disturbed processing of salient signals of emotion and the inability to inhibit automatic responses.