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The Environmental Humanities and the Ancient World

Questions and Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 July 2020

Christopher Schliephake
Affiliation:
Universität Augsburg

Summary

What can a study of antiquity contribute to the interdisciplinary paradigm of the environmental humanities? And how does this recent paradigm influence the way we perceive human-'nature' interactions in pre-modernity? By asking these and a number of related questions, this Element aims to show why the ancient tradition still matters in the Anthropocene. Offering new perspectives to think about what directions the ecological turn could take in classical studies, it revisits old material, including ancient Greek religion and mythology, with central concepts of contemporary environmental theory. It also critically engages with forms of classical reception in current debates, arguing that ancient ecological knowledge is a powerful resource for creating alternative world views.
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Online ISBN: 9781108782005
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 23 July 2020

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