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Christianity and the Problem of Free Will

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2023

Leigh Vicens
Affiliation:
Augustana University, South Dakota

Summary

Central to the teachings of Christianity is a puzzle: on the one hand, sin seems something that humans do not do freely and so cannot be not responsible for, since it is unavoidable; on the other hand, sin seems something that we must be responsible for and so do freely, since we are enjoined to repent of it, and since it makes us liable to divine condemnation and forgiveness. After laying out the puzzle in more depth, this Element considers three possible responses—libertarian, soft determinist, and free-will skeptic—and weighs the costs and benefits of each.
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Online ISBN: 9781009270427
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 08 June 2023

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Christianity and the Problem of Free Will
  • Leigh Vicens, Augustana University, South Dakota
  • Online ISBN: 9781009270427
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Christianity and the Problem of Free Will
  • Leigh Vicens, Augustana University, South Dakota
  • Online ISBN: 9781009270427
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Christianity and the Problem of Free Will
  • Leigh Vicens, Augustana University, South Dakota
  • Online ISBN: 9781009270427
Available formats
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