Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home
A Student's Guide to Entropy
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 9
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Dean, E. T. R. 2015. Particle mechanics approach to continuum constitutive modelling. Geotechnical Research, Vol. 2, Issue. 1, p. 3.

    Angsuwatanakul, Thanate Iramina, Keiji and Kaewkamnerdpong, Boonserm 2015. Brain complexity analysis of functional near infrared spectroscopy for working memory study. p. 1.

    Mitchell, Ben Tosun, Hasari and Sheppard, John 2015. Deep learning using partitioned data vectors. p. 1.

    Tosun, Hasari Mitchell, Ben and Sheppard, John 2016. Assessing diffusion of spatial features in Deep Belief Networks. p. 1625.

    Tosun, Hasari and Sheppard, John 2016. Fast classifier learning under bounded computational resources using Partitioned Restricted Boltzmann Machines. p. 2894.

    Barbosa de Almeida, Mauro W. 2017. The Anthropology of Sustainability. p. 273.

    MURALIDHAR BAIRY, G. NIRANJAN, U. C. OH, SHU LIH KOH, JOEL E. W. SUDARSHAN, VIDYA K. TAN, JEN HONG HAGIWARA, YUKI and NG, EDDIE Y. K. 2017. ALCOHOLIC INDEX USING NON-LINEAR FEATURES EXTRACTED FROM DIFFERENT FREQUENCY BANDS. Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 17, Issue. 07, p. 1740009.

    Krpan, Dario 2017. Behavioral Priming 2.0: Enter a Dynamical Systems Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 8, Issue. ,

    Paillusson, Fabien 2018. Gibbs’ paradox according to Gibbs and slightly beyond. Molecular Physics, Vol. 116, Issue. 21-22, p. 3196.

    ×

Book description

Striving to explore the subject in as simple a manner as possible, this book helps readers understand the elusive concept of entropy. Innovative aspects of the book include the construction of statistical entropy from desired properties, the derivation of the entropy of classical systems from purely classical assumptions, and a statistical thermodynamics approach to the ideal Fermi and ideal Bose gases. Derivations are worked through step-by-step and important applications are highlighted in over 20 worked examples. Around 50 end-of-chapter exercises test readers' understanding. The book also features a glossary giving definitions for all essential terms, a time line showing important developments, and list of books for further study. It is an ideal supplement to undergraduate courses in physics, engineering, chemistry and mathematics.

Reviews

'In A Student’s Guide to Entropy, Don Lemons conveys both mathematical and physical intuition of entropy … [he] is very thorough, clear, and succinct in his explanations, making sure that no subtlety is left unnoticed or unaccounted for. The reader feels that he/she is being taught and guided by an experienced teacher of thermodynamics and entropy … This book will be essential not only to students but also to faculty who are charged with the difficult task of teaching a subject that involves entropy … a thorough, self-contained guide to entropy for students and teachers.'

Effrosyni Seitaridou Source: American Journal of Physics

'The book is well written … Highly recommended.'

Source: Choice

'… a truly first-rate book on the subject, and I would happily recommend it as the main (and inexpensive) text for a course of statistical mechanics.'

Source: The Observatory

'A Student's Guide to Entropy is an excellent textbook for undergraduate students and early stage graduate students in physics and engineering. … Each concept is well defined - mathematical derivation of theories is rigorous and proceeds from fundamental notions to their final form in a methodical, step-by-step manner. The physical meaning of these equations is then explained in simple words, which is perhaps the most impressive feature of this book.'

Prashant Khare Source: Contemporary Physics

Refine List

Actions for selected content:

Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Contents

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed