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  • Print publication year: 2012
  • Online publication date: October 2012

Chapter 10 - The genetics of the phobic disorders and generalized anxiety disorder

Summary

The use of databases and computational methods to sort out the potential functional significance of a gene or variation implicated in a linkage or association is now relatively easy and is becoming more commonplace. This chapter describes databases and available computational-based functional analysis tools that can facilitate understanding of the biological meaningfulness of an association involving a specific genomic region, gene, or specific variation. DNA sequence data must be dealt with at some level in any genetic investigation. For example, translating DNA or RNA sequences in protein sequences is a basic task in sequence analysis. Sequence alignments are a robust tool used for many purposes, the most common of which is the identification of similar stretches of sequence across DNA or protein regions. An emerging set of resources and databases for gene expression analysis of relevance to genetic studies of neuropsychiatric diseases are "expression quantitative trait locus" or "eQTL" resources.

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