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Oxytocin, Vasopressin and Related Peptides in the Regulation of Behavior
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Book description

The mammalian neurohypophyseal peptide hormones oxytocin and vasopressin act to mediate human social behavior - they affect trust and social relationships and have an influence on avoidance responses. Describing the evolutionary roots of the effects that these neuropeptides have on behavior, this book examines remarkable parallel findings in both humans and non-human animals. The chapters are structured around three key issues: the molecular and neurohormonal mechanisms of peptides; phylogenetic considerations of their role in vertebrates; and their related effects on human behavior, social cognition and clinical applications involving psychiatric disorders such as autism. A final chapter summarizes current research perspectives and reflects on the outlook for future developments. Providing a comparative overview and featuring contributions from leading researchers, this is a valuable resource for graduate students, researchers and clinicians in this rapidly developing field.

Reviews

'The clearly written and well-referenced chapters deal with molecular mechanisms, phylogenetic considerations and clinical applications, as well as effects on human behaviour, and the final chapter suggests potential lines of future research. A well-organised and presented book on a splendidly interesting subject.'

Malcolm Dando Source: The Biologist

'It will, however, be quite useful for anybody working in this area, including graduate students. The Medline search … suggests that many researchers are currently moving into this area. These researchers will find this compilation of chapters on social aspects of AVP/OT peptides a great introduction to this field. I, for one, will use this book as a valuable resource.'

Geert J. De Vries Source: American Journal of Human Biology

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