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Micro-organisms and Earth Systems
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Book description

There is growing awareness that important environmental transformations are catalysed, mediated and influenced by microorganisms, and geomicrobiology can be defined as the influence of microorganisms on geologic processes. This is probably the most rapidly growing area of microbiology at present, combining environmental and molecular microbiology together with significant areas of mineralogy, geochemistry and hydrology. This volume focuses on the function of microorganisms in the environment and their influence on 'global' processes. It will include state-of-the art approaches to visualisation, culture and identification, community interactions and gene transfer, and diversity studies in relation to key processes. This overview for researchers and graduate students will represent environmental microbiology in its broadest sense and help to promote exciting collaborations between microbiologists and those in complementary physical and chemical disciplines.

Reviews

‘This book constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of biogeosciences and will interest not only microbial ecologists and geomicrobiologists, but also all scientists working with a multidisciplinary perspective and approach to understand the Earth‘s biogeosystem.‘

Source: Microbiology Today

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Contents

  • Soil micro-organisms in Antarctic dry valleys: resource supply and utilization
    pp 71-84
    • By D. W. Hopkins, School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK, B. Elberling, Institute of Geography, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350, Copenhagen K., Denmark, L. G. Greenfield, School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand, E. G. Gregorich, Agriculture Canada, Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0C6, P. Novis, Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research, PO Box 69, Lincoln 8152, New Zealand, A. G. O'Donnell, Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK, A. D. Sparrow, School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Nevada, 1000 Valley Rd, Reno, NV 89512, USA
  • Iron, nitrogen, phosphorus and zinc cycling and consequences for primary productivity in the oceans
    pp 247-272
    • By John A. Raven, Plant Research Unit, Division of Environmental and Applied Biology, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland, UK, Karen Brown, Plant Research Unit, Division of Environmental and Applied Biology, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland, UK, Maggie Mackay, Plant Research Unit, Division of Environmental and Applied Biology, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland, UK, John Beardall, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia, Mario Giordano, Department of Marine Science, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona, Italy, Espen Granum, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK, Richard C. Leegood, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK, Kieryn Kilminster, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, M090 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia, Diana I. Walker, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, M090 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia

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