Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
  • Print publication year: 2014
  • Online publication date: October 2014

Chapter 4 - Headache

References

1. Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (2004). The international classification of headache disorders. Cephalalgia 24(supp 1): 1–151.
2. HopJW, RinkelGJE, AlgraA, van GijnJ (1997). Case–fatality rates and functional outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review. Stroke 28: 660–664.
3. RinkelGJ, van GijnJ, WijdicksEF (1993). Subarachnoid haemorrhage without detectable aneurysm. A review of the causes. Stroke 24: 1403–1409.
4. van GijnJ, RinkelGJE (2001). Subarachnoid haemorrhage: diagnosis, causes and management. Brain 124: 249–278.
5. van GijnJ, van DongenKJ (1982). The time course of aneurysmal haemorrhage on computed tomograms. Neuroradiology 23: 153–156.
6. HutchinsonPJ, KirkpatrickPJ (2012). Diagnosing subarachnoid hemorrhage: are CT scans enough?Nat Rev Neurol 10: 126–127.
7. LatchawRE (1997). The role of CT following aneurysmal rupture. Neuroimaging Clin N Am 7: 693–708.
8. VanderJagtM (1999). Validity of prediction of the site of ruptured intracranial aneurysms with CT. Neurology 52: 34–39.
9. RuelleA, CavazzaniP, AndrioliG (1988). Extracranial posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm causing isolated intraventricular hemorrhage: a case report. Neurosurgery 23: 774–777.
10. SchmidUD, SteigerHJ, HuberP (1987). Accuracy of high resolution computed tomography in direct diagnosis of cerebral aneurysms. Neuroradiology 29: 152–159.
11. LatchawRE (1997). The role of CT following aneurysmal rupture. Neuroimaging Clin N Am 7: 693–708.
12. LeblancR (1987). The minor leak preceding subarachnoid hemorrhage. J Neurosurg 66: 35–39.
13. VanGijnJ, VanDongenKJ, VermeulenM, HijdraA (1985). Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurology 35: 493–497.
14. MitchellP, WilkinsonID, HoggardN, et al (2001). Detection of subarachnoid haemorrhage with magnetic resonance imaging. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 70: 205–211.
15. BedersonJB, ConnollyES Jr, BatjerHH, et al. (2009). Guidelines for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a statement for healthcare professionals from a special writing group of the Stroke Council, American Heart Association. Stroke 40: 994–1025.
16. PolmearA (2003). Sentinel headaches in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: what is the true incidence? A systematic review. Cephalalgia 23: 935–941.
17. de FalcoFA (2004). Sentinel headache. Neurol Sci 25(suppl 3): S215–S217.
18. VlakMHM, AlgraA, BrandenburgR, RinkelGJE (2011). Prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, with emphasis on sex, age, comorbidity, country, and time period: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Neurol 10: 626–636.
19. SaposnikG, BarinagarrementeriaF, BrownRD, et al. (2011). Diagnosis and management of cerebral venous thrombosis: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Stroke 42: 1158–1192.
20. de BruijnSF, StamJ, KappelleLJ, for the CVST study group (1996). Thunderclap headache as the first symptom of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Lancet 348: 1623–1625.
21. CumurcicR, CrassardI, SarovM, et al. (2005). Headache as the only neurological sign of cerebral venous thrombosis: a series of 17 cases. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 76: 1084–1087.
22. RolandT, JacobsJ, RappaportA, et al. (2010). Unenhanced brain CT is useful to decide on further imaging in suspected venous sinus thrombosis. Clin Radiol 65: 34–39.
23. LeachJL, FortunaRB, JonesBV, et al. (2006). Imaging of cerebral venous thrombosis: current techniques, spectrum of findings, and diagnostic pitfalls. RadioGraphics 26: S19–43.
24. OppenheimC, DomigoV, GauvritJY, et al. (2005). Subarachnoid hemorrhage as the initial presentation of dural sinus thrombosis. AJNR 26: 614–617.
25. CalabreseLH, DodickDW, SchwedtTJ, SinghalAB (2007). Narrative review: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. Ann Intern Med 146: 34–44.
26. ShinghalAB, Hajj-AliRA, TopcuogluMA, et al. (2011). Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes: analysis of 139 cases. Arch Neurol 68: 1005–1012.
27. DucrosA, BoukobzaM, PorcherR, et al. (2007). The clinical and radiological spectrum of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. A prospective series of 67 patients. Brain 130: 3091–3101.
28. MandellDM, MatoukCC;, FarbRI, et al. (2012). Vessel wall MRI to differentiate between reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and central nervous system vasculitis: preliminary results. Stroke 43: 860–862.
29. MokriB (2000). Cerebrospinal fluid volume depletion and its emerging clinical/imaging syndromes. Neurosurg Focus 9: e6.
30. SchievinkWI, WijdicksEF, MeyerFB, et al. (2001). Spontaneous intracranial hypotension mimicking aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurosurgery 48: 513–516.
31. SpelleL, BoulinA, TainturierC, et al. (2001). Neuroimaging features of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Neuroradiology 43: 622–627.
32. MokriB (1999). Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: from intracranial hypotension to cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia – evolution of a conceptMayo Clin Proc 74: 1113–1123.
33. McKinneyAM, ShortJ, TruwitCL, et al. (2007). Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: incidence of atypical regions of involvement and imaging findings. AJR 189: 904–912.
34. SencakovaD, MokriB, McClellandRL (2001). The efficacy of epidural blood patch in spontaneous CSF leaks. Neurology 57: 1921–1923.
35. BerroirS, LoiselB, DucrosA, et al. (2004). Early epidural blood patch in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Neurology 63: 1950–1951.
36. TomodaY, KorogiY, AokiT, et al. (2008). Detection of cerebrospinal fluid leakage: initial experience with three-dimensional fast spin-echo magnetic resonance myelography. Acta Radiol 49: 197–203.
37. WatanabeA, HorikoshiT, UchidaM, et al. (2009). Diagnostic value of spinal MR imaging in spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome. AJNR 30: 147–151.
38. SchievinkWI (2006). Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks and intracranial hypotension. JAMA 295: 2286–2296.
39. MokriB (2003). Headaches caused by decreased intracranial pressure: diagnosis and management. Curr Opin Neurol 16: 319–326.
40. WangYF, LirngJF, FuhJL, HseuSS, WangSJ (2009). Heavily T2-weighted MR myelography vs. CT myelography in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Neurology 73: 1892–1898.
41. VanopdenboschLJ, DedekenP, CasselmanJW, VlamincSA (2011). MRI with intrathecal gadolinium to detect a CSF leak: a prospective open-label cohort study. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 82: 456–458.
42. DillonWP (2008). Intrathecal gadolinium: its time has come?AJNR 29: 3–4
43. van GijnJ, RinkelGJ (2001). Subarachnoid haemorrhage: diagnosis, causes and management. Brain 124: 249–278.
44. SchwedtTJ, MatharuMS, DodickDW (2006). Thunderclap headache. LancetNeurol 5: 621–631.
45. YoungWB, SilbersteinSD (1997). Paroxysmal headache caused by colloid cyst of the third ventricle: case report and review of the literature. Headache 37: 15–20.
46. KellyR (1951). Colloid cysts of the third ventricle: analysis of twenty-nine cases. Brain 74: 23–65.
47. SilbertPL, MokriB, SchievinkWI (1995). Headache and neck pain in spontaneous internal carotid and vertebral artery dissections. Neurology 45: 1517–1522.
48. MitsiasP, RamadanNM (1992). Headache in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Part I:clinical features. Cephalalagia 12: 269–274.
49. Tang-WaiDF, PhanTG, WijdicksEF (2001). Hypertensive encephalopathy presenting with thunderclap headache. Headache 41: 198–200.
50. DodickDW, ErossEJ, DrazkowskiJF, et al (2003). Thunderclap headache associated with reversible vasospasm and posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Cephalalgia 23: 994–997.
51. McKinneyAM, ShortJ, TruwitCL, et al. (2007). Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: incidence of atypical regions of involvement and imaging findings. AJR 189: 904–912.
52. HefzyaHM, BartynskibWS, BoardmanbJF, et al. (2009). Hemorrhage in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: imaging and clinical features. AJNR 30: 1371–1379.
53. KurosuA, AmanoK, KuboO, et al. (1990). Clivus epidural hematoma. J Neurosurg 72: 660–662.
54. TomarasC, HorowitzBL, HarperRL (1995). Spontaneous clivus hematoma: case report and literature review. Neurosurgery 37: 123–124.
55. SchievinkWI, ThompsonRC, LohCT, MayaMM (2001). Spontaneous retroclival hematoma presenting as thunderclap headache. J Neurosurg 95: 522524.
56. FerroJM, MeloTP, OliveiraV, et al. (1995). A multivariate study of headache associated with ischemic stroke. Headache 35: 315–319.
57. SchwedtTJ, DodickDW (2006). Thunderclap stroke: embolic cerebellar infarcts presenting as thunderclap headache. Headache 46: 520–522.
58. LamonteM, SilbersteinSD, MarcelisJF (1995). Headache associated withaseptic meningitis. Headache 35: 520–526.
59. EvansRW (2007). Thunderclap headache associated with a nonhemorrhagic anaplastic oligodendroglioma. MedGenMed 9: 26.
60. MucchiutM, ValentinisL, TunizF, et al. (2007). Adult aqueductal stenosis presenting as thunderclap headache: a case report. Cephalalgia 27: 1171–1173.
61. KotwicaZ, BrezinskiJ (1985). Chronic subdural hematoma presenting as spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. Report of six cases. J Neurosurg 63: 691–692.