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Human Rights, State Compliance, and Social Change
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  • Cited by 3
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Tartakoff, Laura Ymayo 2016. Ethnic Identity and Gender in Pluralist Perú. Society, Vol. 53, Issue. 1, p. 67.

    Odysseos, Louiza 2015. The question concerning human rights and human rightlessness: disposability and struggle in the Bhopal gas disaster. Third World Quarterly, Vol. 36, Issue. 6, p. 1041.

    Moore, Will H. and Welch, Ryan M. 2015. Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. p. 1.

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Book description

National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) – human rights commissions and ombudsmen – have gained recognition as a possible missing link in the transmission and implementation of international human rights norms at the domestic level. They are also increasingly accepted as important participants in global and regional forums where international norms are produced. By collecting innovative work from experts spanning international law, political science, sociology and human rights practice, this book critically examines the significance of this relatively new class of organizations. It focuses, in particular, on the prospects of these institutions to effectuate state compliance and social change. Consideration is given to the role of NHRIs in delegitimizing – though sometimes legitimizing – governments' poor human rights records and in mobilizing – though sometimes demobilizing – civil society actors. The volume underscores the broader implications of such cross-cutting research for scholarship and practice in the fields of human rights and global affairs in general.

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