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  • Print publication year: 2012
  • Online publication date: November 2012

Chapter 14 - Positive Behavior Support and Young People with Autism

from Part IV - Successful Implementation of Specific Programmes and Interventions:

Summary

Attitudes toward innovation can be a facilitating or limiting factor in the dissemination and implementation of new technologies. Several demographic and professional characteristics of providers have been found to be related to attitudes toward evidence-based practice, as measured by the evidence-based practice attitude scale (EBPAS). Organizational culture and climate both have been found to be related to providers' attitudes toward evidence-based practice. Positive climate measured by the organizational readiness for change scale was negatively related to divergence scores on the EBPAS and demoralizing or negative organizational climate has been found to be positively related to divergence scores. Leadership behaviors in an organization, specifically transformational and transactional leadership, have been related to attitudes toward evidence-based practice. Transactional leadership was positively associated with the openness subscale and marginally positively associated with the requirements subscale.

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