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Global Warming
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Book description

Global warming and climate change are growing environmental concerns which are much in the scientific, governmental and public eye. The potential impact on freshwater and marine fishes is immense, because most fish have no physiological ability to regulate their body temperature. This volume focuses on the effects of temperature at all levels of organization in fish, with particular emphasis on physiological function: cells, epithelia, organ systems, the whole organism, reproduction, behaviour, pollutant interactions, ecology and population dynamics, with each chapter written by experts in the field. Many chapters also speculate on the long-term physiological and ecological implications to fish of a 2-4°C global warming scenario. Researchers and graduate students in the areas of animal physiology and behaviour, environmental toxicology, population ecology and fisheries biology and management will find this volume of particular interest.

Reviews

Review of the hardback:‘ … this book is essential reading for anyone working in the fields of fish ecology, behaviour, physiology, and fisheries biology.’

R. S. Batty Source: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology

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