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The First Farmers of Europe
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  • Cited by 2
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Cheddadi, Rachid Palmisano, Alessio López-Sáez, José Antonio Nourelbait, Madja Zielhofer, Christoph Tabel, Jalal Rhoujjati, Ali Khater, Carla Woodbridge, Jessie Lucarini, Giulio Broodbank, Cyprian Fletcher, William J and Roberts, Neil 2019. Human demography changes in Morocco and environmental imprint during the Holocene. The Holocene, p. 095968361982665.

    Fort, Joaquim Mercè Pareta, Maria and Sørensen, Lasse 2018. Estimating the relative importance of demic and cultural diffusion in the spread of the Neolithic in Scandinavia. Journal of The Royal Society Interface, Vol. 15, Issue. 148, p. 20180597.

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Book description

Knowledge of the origin and spread of farming has been revolutionised in recent years by the application of new scientific techniques, especially the analysis of ancient DNA from human genomes. In this book, Stephen Shennan presents the latest research on the spread of farming by archaeologists, geneticists and other archaeological scientists. He shows that it resulted from a population expansion from present-day Turkey. Using ideas from the disciplines of human behavioural ecology and cultural evolution, he explains how this process took place. The expansion was not the result of 'population pressure' but of the opportunities for increased fertility by colonising new regions that farming offered. The knowledge and resources for the farming 'niche' were passed on from parents to their children. However, Shennan demonstrates that the demographic patterns associated with the spread of farming resulted in population booms and busts, not continuous expansion.

Reviews

'Shennan's book is likely to become an important text for scholars concerned with the archeology of Europe and the Neolithic generally, as well as a wider readership interested in a key transition in human history. A grand narrative indeed.'

Source: Evolutionary Anthropology

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