Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Book description

#FeesMustFall, the student revolt that began in October 2015, was an uprising against lack of access to, and financial exclusion from, higher education in South Africa. More broadly, it radically questioned the socio-political dispensation resulting from the 1994 social pact between big business, the ruling elite and the liberation movement. The 2015 revolt links to national and international youth struggles of the recent past and is informed by black consciousness politics and social movements of the international left. Yet, its objectives are more complex than those of earlier struggles. The student movement has challenged the hierarchical, top-down leadership system of university management and it’s ‘double speak’ of professing to act in workers’ and students’ interests yet entrenching a regressive system for control and governance. University managements, while on one level amenable to change, have also co-opted students into their ranks to create co-responsibility for the highly bureaucratised university financial aid that stands in the way of their social revolution. This book maps the contours of student discontent a year after the start of the #FeesMustFall revolt. Student voices dissect colonialism, improper compromises by the founders of democratic South Africa, feminism, worker rights and meaningful education. In-depth assessments by prominent scholars reflect on the complexities of student activism, its impact on national and university governance, and offer provocative analyses of the power of the revolt.

Refine List

Actions for selected content:

Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Contents


Page 1 of 2


  • Preface
    pp viii-x
    • By David Everatt, David Everatt is a professor and the head of school at the Wits School of Governance and was formerly in the Gauteng City Regional Observatory (GCRO). He has authored a book on white liberalism, has edited a number of books, edited two special editions of Politikon, and was formerly employed by the Community Agency for Social Enquiry (Case). He has participated in several large-scale youth surveys.
  • Introduction
    pp 1-20
    • By Susan Booysen, Susan Booysen is a professor at the Wits School of Governance. She is the author of Dominance and Decline: The ANC in the Time of Zuma (2015); The African National Congress and the Regeneration of Political Power (2011); the e-book The ANC's March on Mangaung (2012) and is the editor of Local Elections in South Africa: Parties, People, Politics (2012) and Compendium of Elections in Southern Africa, 1989–2009: 20 years of Multiparty Democracy (2009, with Denis Kadima).
  • Chapter 1 - Two weeks in October: Changing governance in South Africa
    pp 22-52
    • By Susan Booysen, Susan Booysen is a professor at the Wits School of Governance. She is the author of Dominance and Decline: The ANC in the Time of Zuma (2015); The African National Congress and the Regeneration of Political Power (2011); the e-book The ANC's March on Mangaung (2012) and is the editor of Local Elections in South Africa: Parties, People, Politics (2012) and Compendium of Elections in Southern Africa, 1989–2009: 20 years of Multiparty Democracy (2009, with Denis Kadima).
  • Chapter 2 - The roots of the revolution
    pp 54-73
    • By Gillian Godsell, Gillian Godsell studied at the universities of the Witwatersrand, Stellenbosch, Leiden and Pretoria. She has a PhD from Boston University. She has worked at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Centre for Developing Business at Wits, the Faculty of Education at the University of Johannesburg and currently works at the Wits School of Governance., Rekgotsofetse Chikane, Rekgotsofetse (Kgotsi) Chikane is the national president of InkuluFreeHeid, a nonpartisan youth organisation that works to enhance social cohesion, deepen democracy and create innovative solutions to socioeconomic problems. He completed his Bachelor's and Honours degrees in Social Science at the University of Cape Town and is currently pursuing a Master's in Management at the Wits School of Governance.
  • Chapter 3 - The game's the same: ‘MustFall’ moves to Euro-America
    pp 74-86
    • By Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh, Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh holds an MPhil in international relations from the University of Oxford, and an Honours degree in politics, philosophy and economics from the University of Cape Town. A Weidenfeld scholar, he was one of the Mail & Guardian's ‘top 200 young South Africans’ in 2013. In 2010, he served as president of the UCT student representative council. He is currently pursuing a DPhil in international relations at the University of Oxford, and writing a book of essays on South African politics.
  • Chapter 5 - Documenting the revolution
    pp 101-124
    • By Gillian Godsell, Gillian Godsell studied at the universities of the Witwatersrand, Stellenbosch, Leiden and Pretoria. She has a PhD from Boston University. She has worked at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Centre for Developing Business at Wits, the Faculty of Education at the University of Johannesburg and currently works at the Wits School of Governance., Refiloe Lepere, Refiloe Lepere is a postgraduate research coordinator teaching critical reflexive praxis in Drama for Life at the University of Witwatersrand. She is also a dramaturge at the South African State Theatre., Swankie Mafoko, Swankie Mafoko is an Honours student at Drama for Life at Wits, studying applied theatre. She is an actress and dancer with over six years of ballet experience, and has performed in a number of plays. Her work aims to educate and empower different communities., Ayabonga Nase, Ayabonga Nase is a candidate attorney at the Centre for Applied Legal Studies based at the University of the Witwatersrand. He holds an LLB degree from the University of Fort Hare and a certificate in advanced administrative law from the Mandela Institute at Wits. He is a Fellow of the Bertha Justice Initiative, a movement that supports organisations that practise public interest law.
  • Chapter 7 - Learning from student protests in sub-Saharan Africa
    pp 148-168
    • By Lynn Hewlett, Lynn Hewlett is a senior lecturer at the Wits School of Governance and currently convenor of the PhD programme. Prior to joining the Wits School of Governance she worked in further and higher education in South Africa and the UK. Her current research interests encompass higher education policy and practices, curriculum, capacity building and development, literacy and language studies and educational development and evaluation of learning and capacity-building programmes., Nomagugu Mukadah, Nomagugu (Gugu) Masuku-Mukadah is a researcher at the Centre for Learning on Evaluation and Results in Anglophone Africa based at the University of the Witwatersrand., Koffi Kouakou, Koffi Kouakou, an African analyst and scenario strategist, is a former senior lecturer at the Wits School of Governance, where he taught strategic government communications and scenario planning. He is the former director of the Unilever Mandela Rhodes Academy for Communications and Marketing (UMRA) at the University of the Witwatersrand., Horácio Zandamela, Horácio Lucas Zandamela, born in Mozambique, obtained his Master's and Doctoral degrees from the Wits Graduate School of Public and Development Management, now the Wits School of Governance.
  • Conclusion: Aluta Continua!
    pp 309-315
    • By Susan Booysen, Susan Booysen is a professor at the Wits School of Governance. She is the author of Dominance and Decline: The ANC in the Time of Zuma (2015); The African National Congress and the Regeneration of Political Power (2011); the e-book The ANC's March on Mangaung (2012) and is the editor of Local Elections in South Africa: Parties, People, Politics (2012) and Compendium of Elections in Southern Africa, 1989–2009: 20 years of Multiparty Democracy (2009, with Denis Kadima).

Page 1 of 2


Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed